Entertainment news for May 22, 1992 | EW.com


Entertainment news for May 22, 1992

Geena Davis, Kevin Costner, and Whitney Houston made headlines this week

FLY GIRL: Geena Davis is trading in her Thelma & Louise wheels for wings. Davis will star as legendary flyer Beryl Markham — the first person to fly solo westward across the Atlantic, a feat she documented in her 1942 best-seller, West With the Night. Executive producer Sydney Pollack has scheduled filming to start on the $30 million epic in September.

HOT SPOT: ABC’s On the Air isn’t the only new David Lynch series coming to television this year. HBO has also signed a deal with the Twin Peaks creator for an anthology series, The Hotel. Debuting next fall, the half-hour drama will take place in the same hotel room every episode, but in different years, from 1900 to the future. Authors writing scripts for the show include Jay McInerney (Brightness Falls), who is toiling away on a story set in 1992.

GUARDED AFFAIR: Don’t expect Kevin Costner and Whitney Houston to fog up the lens in their Christmas flick, The Bodyguard, a thriller about a he-man assigned to protect a rock star- turned-actress. Steamy scenes were filmed and have been shown on TV, but Warner Bros. has flip-flopped on how they’ll be used. A Warner spokesman insists the salt-and-pepper romance isn’t the crux of the film. ”It’s not Jungle Fever,” he stresses, adding that filmmakers are ”a long way off from deciding” on a final cut…

ROYAL CAINE: This December Michael Caine publishes his autobiography, What’s It All About?, which takes its title from the theme song from his 1966 hit, Alfie, and details his mostly pleasant romp through a life of show biz. ”I told the publishers, ‘I’ll write 150 pages, then you tell me if I need a ghostwriter,”’ he says. ”I took them the pages and they said, ‘You don’t need a ghostwriter. Would you like to write novels?”’ But Turtle Bay Books publisher Joni Evans says it’s too early to know what their storylines might be….

NEVER TOO LATE: The New Yorker may have rejected Jim Henson’s cartoons — submitted when the Muppetmeister was in his early 20s — but Random House has no such qualms and will publish a collection of his artwork next year. A lavish coffeetable compendium will feature 400 color illustrations by Henson, including his original sketches for Kermit. Random House also plans to release a full-scale biography penned by Pulitzer Prize-winner Ron Powers.

Written by: Leonard Klady, Benjamin Svetkey, Pat H. Broeske, Bart Mills, and Herma Rosenthal