Entertainment news for November 6, 1992 | EW.com

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Entertainment news for November 6, 1992

Chris Robinson, Robin Willliams, and John Malkovich made the headlines this week

TAKING A STAND: The Black Crowes’ lead singer, Chris Robinson, delivered the ultimate insult to an audience member at a recent L.A. concert. Miffed that a too-cool patron in the front row sat down while the rest of the crowd was on its feet, the razor-thin vocalist pointed down and suggested he trade seats with people standing in the back. ”Or better yet,” said Robinson, ”go home and watch VH-1. Michael Bolton must be on by now.”…

‘TOYS’ BOY: Last year Robin Williams was Mr. Press the Media Flesh, heavily hawking Hook and The Fisher King. But for his two big holiday releases — Disney’s Aladdin and Fox’s Barry Levinson-directed Toys — Williams has made himself scarce. Rumor had it that Williams was worried about overexposure. Fact is, he will be doing press but less than usual. Publicist Mark Rutenberg says the actor would be doing interviews, but he’s in Europe working on his next picture, Being Human. And Fox spokesman David Elzer huffs, ”To say he’s not doing publicity is completely wrong.” Williams is scheduled to appear on Late Night With David Letterman and other shows when he returns to the States. As for Aladdin, a Disney spokesman declined to comment….

NOSE FLAP: TV has been kind to Ann Magnuson, but that didn’t stop her from poking fun at industry icons in her recent one-woman New York show, You Could be Home Now. The former Anything But Love star performs an ode to NBC News anchor Tom Brokaw: ”The twinkle in his eye, the boyish grin, the authoritative hair, that strange flap of skin under his nose.” Hmmm. Does Brokaw know? An NBC spokeswoman says he hopes to see the show before it closes. Magnuson says she wouldn’t mind if he was in the audience. ”There are a couple of comments about the Kennedys and Richard Gere (in the show),” she says. ”I’d be more nervous if they were coming.”…

BIG JOHN: As the hulking Lennie in Of Mice and Men, 6-foot-1-inch John Malkovich seems to tower a lot more than 3 measly inches over his 5-foot-10- inch costar (and director), Gary Sinise (and everybody else, for that matter). How did Malkovich manage to walk so tall? Coproducer Russ Smith attributes the illusion to bulky torso padding, hefty shoe lifts — and acting. ”Lennie was a guy who could tap into his adrenaline,” says Smith. ”When John got mad, it was scary.”

Dave DiMartino, Frank Spotnitz, Paul Geitner, Tim Purtell