The inside scoop on the book world |


The inside scoop on the book world

Art Bell, Michael Korda, and Charles Conrad made book news this week

Coming soong
Radio host Art Bell and best-selling UFO abductee Whitley Strieber (Communion) are teaming up to write The Coming Superstorm, which will combine history with a guide to surviving the next Ice Age and will be out in December. ”There’s real science, real archaeology,” says Pocket Books senior editor Mitchell Ivers, who made the mid-six-figure acquisition. In another six-figure deal, New Line bought the film rights to Choice of Evil, the new installment of Andrew Vachss’ hard-boiled Burke series and the first to delve into the supernatural. ”It builds on all the cool stuff the Burke books have done in the past but brings it into a whole new area,” says Lloyd Segan, the producer working with New Line. The novel is due from Knopf this month.

More than a thousand employees of Random House Inc. recently received a copy of Another Life, the memoir of longtime Simon & Schuster editor Michael Korda that was just published by Random House and includes tales of working with a drunk Tennessee Williams and a high-strung Jacqueline Susann. ”I thought the book truly illuminates the great publishing tradition and excitement that has drawn so many to this business,” says chief Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum.

Siege mentality
Shangri-La, the mythical Himalayan kingdom that inspired James Hilton’s novel Lost Horizon — and was ”discovered” last year by adventurer Ian Baker — has inspired two books. Last month, Random House paid a reported $500,000 for Beyond the Falls, Baker’s story of his 12-year-long search along the Tsangpo Gorge for the waterfall he named Hidden Falls, which, according to Tibetan legend, is the entrance to the otherworldly realm. Now Broadway Books has made a six-figure world-rights deal for The Siege of Shangri-La, in which travel journalist Michael McRae will tell the history of the search for the legendary region, going back to British explorers in the 1920s. ”It’s very similar to the Everest [books] phenomenon,” says Broadway exec editor Charles Conrad, who made the deal. ”Everyone has a different perspective, and there’s an audience for each one.” Conrad expects Siege to be out in late 2000.