''Deuce Bigalow'''s success could spawn new lingo | EW.com


''Deuce Bigalow'''s success could spawn new lingo

Catchprase king Rob Schneider tells how ''man whore'' could be the next ''Steve-meister''

Rob Schneider

'MALE' CARRIER Schneider comes up with a new lexicon in ''Deuce'' (Myles Aronowitz)

Judging by the initial success of ”Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo” (which debuted with a surprisingly high $12.2 million), you may start to hear Rob Schneider’s new gigo-lingo off screen very soon. His new terms for male prostitutes – calling them ”man whores” and ”he-bitches” – have that infectious quality that may well make them the insult of choice for college-age moviegoers everywhere. And Schneider knows the secret to holding the nation captive by a catchphrase: When he invented the Copy Guy on ”Saturday Night Live” (during his 1991-94 stint), he made adding the suffix ”-meister” to names a national pasttime. EW Online sat down with Schneider to discuss the pros – and cons – of being a quote-inator, and how his buddy Adam Sandler (who executive-produced ”Deuce”) made him pay for it.

Do you think ”man whore” might make it into the vernacular?
That’s right, baby. I had the same feeling with this as I did with the Richmeister [the Copy Guy].

Did it ever get annoying when everyone was parroting the Copy Guy back to you?
It does get old, but I’m also overly sensitive toward people who really think that’s funny, that they’re GETTING me, and that no one else has ever done that. And I don’t want to spoil that. And 99.9 percent of them are really nice.

What about the other 0.1 percent?
When I was famous on ”SNL,” they would go [in drunk, frat-boy voice], ”Steve-o! Hey, Steve-o! Come here, man! Let me buy you a beer! Why not? What’s your problem, a–hole? F— you!” I was like, O-kay, bars are out. And I didn’t go to them for about two years. And now I don’t think I’ll go again for a while.

But then you must have heard ”You can do eet!”for a while after it was your catchphrase in ”The Waterboy.”
Adam’s whole idea with that role was an inside joke just for him. He called me up a week before the movie opened and said, ”It’s gonna be like the copy machine guy. Pretty soon, you’re not gonna be able to go anywhere without ‘You can do eet!”’ One day I counted 50 times I got it. I said, ”You son of a bitch, you’re right, I can’t go anywhere.” And he just loves that.

At least it erased the memory of the Copy Guy.
It completely supplanted that. I still get the older guys in the business section of planes, though. ”Hey, Steve-o! Steve-inator! Sitting next to Steve-o. Steve-man, getting up and moving. Changing seats. Change-o-rama.”

Considering all the other ”SNL” movies, I’m surprised there was never a ”Copy Guy” film.
That’s why I’m still in show business, because I never did a movie like that. I was offered it by a couple of movie studios. I was like, ”No. Me careful. Me like show business. Me have no other skills. Me must make that work.”