Mail from our readers |


Mail from our readers

Check out letters from those who agreed with us, and those who didn't, on ''X-Men,'' Elian Gonzalez, and more

Mail from our readers

She works hard for her money, but we didn’t treat her right. So say angry fans who found our snub of Donna Summer’s Divas 2000 performance unforgivable. ”I can’t believe you excluded the best singer!” sniffs Michael B. Begun III of Rocky Hill, Conn. We did placate X-Men fans with our Summer Movie Preview. ”It’s about time we got some real pictures from the film,” writes Bobby Warren of Brownwood, Tex. ”I was getting tired of that stupid silver ‘X.”’ (Yeah, so were we.) Meanwhile, Rachel Orr of Harrison Township, Mich., offers this burning question: ”Hugh Jackman looks like Mario Van Peebles on your cover and a young Clint Eastwood inside. What does the guy really look like?” Either way, he makes our day.

The Joy of ”X”
When I grabbed the issue with my favorite superheroes, the X-Men, on the cover, all of my day’s mishaps were washed away completely. Right in front of me were real-live versions of Storm, Cyclops, Professor X, and last but not least, Mystique (who, played by Rebecca Romijn-Stamos, looks repulsive and enticing at the same time). Thank you so much for bringing a little sunshine to my life!
Tim Tevault
Pomona, Calif.

So, what’s it take to get a 10 on the Buzz-O-Meter?? Certainly not a year of your own hype engine talking about the multiple websites, coming toys, casting, and an amazing (make that uncanny) two-page cover. Face it, X marks the spot for summer 2000 and the X-Men movie launches what could become a franchise as big as Batman (and it kills me to make that comparison because it really is in a league by itself). Keep up the great work—I could never survive my many airport adventures without you.
Tom Banton
Provincetown, Mass.

Emmy Oversights
I wholeheartedly agree about Buffy the Vampire Slayer’s lack of recognition. Buffy, along with Oz, represents the two most neglected hours of drama on TV. But it’s impossible to author any article about Emmy’s neglectfulness without mentioning Will & Grace. Maybe I don’t appreciate the finer art of TV critiquing, but how does Megan Mullally not have an Emmy already?
James B. Gutsche

Elían Embargo”]
I was appalled to find ”Thinking Elían should go” as ”In” and ”Thinking Elín should stay” as ”Five minutes ago” in ”The Shaw Report.” It is incredibly insulting to discover this critical decision dismissed as fashionably passe, alongside such other matters of ideological importance as ”Jennifer Lopez’s butt.” My report: In: Thinking Jessica Shaw should go; Five minutes ago: Thinking Jessica Shaw should stay; Out: EW’s thoughtlessness.
Monica Pelaez

Bella Donna
I am truly appalled at how you dissed VH1 Divas 2000 and totally failed to recognize that there was at least one true diva on that broadcast — Donna Summer! Her performance was nothing less than outstanding! She sounds better live than on record. Wasn’t her lengthy standing ovation the proof in the pudding? Divas 2000 may have fizzled to you, but to me Donna Summer sizzled and sizzled!
Frank Bruno
Washington, D.C.

”Once” and for All
Mike Flaherty’s B+ rating for the season finale of Once and Again was way off base. It’s one of the few new shows to hit the mark for smart dialogue and even smarter acting. Kudos to the writers, producers, and cast for making the late-night Monday time slot worth staying up for.
Cindy Taylor
Hickory, N.C.

Rocky Mountain Low
I took offense at the remark Bruce Fretts made regarding Chad Lowe being ”stuck playing the four-eyed folksinger”. John Denver was a marvelous talent, a beautiful human being, and a dedicated wildlife protector. He was not just some ”four-eyed folksinger.” Our world was deprived of a very bright star with the passing of John Denver. We could do with fewer comments from the likes of Bruce Fretts.
Betty Love
Lawton, Okla.

Full ”Circle”
Unlike Backstreet Boys and Britney Spears, A Perfect Circle play their own instruments and send meaningful messages through their lyrics. I’d rather listen to a song that is based on real-life experience without what you call ”a real hook” than a studio-fixed, studio-made, studio-produced image and sound that is meaningless and without heart.
Aaron J. Deede
Wilmington, Del.

CORRECTIONS: Me, Myself & Irene was written by Peter and Bobby Farrelly together with their longtime friend Mike Cerrone. Their assistant’s name is J.B. Rogers.