Going to Pot | EW.com


Harvard honors Bruce Willis, Sarah Jessica Parker. Plus, news about Reese Witherspoon, Halle Berry, Ben Affleck, Mel Gibson, Robert Downey Jr., Dave Eggers, Conan O'Brien, John Edwards, Antonio Banderas, and others

Sarah Jessica Parker

(Sarah Jessica Parker: HBO)

TROPHY TIME He sees red people. Bruce Willis and his ”Striking Distance” costar Sarah Jessica Parker will be feted by the crimson-clad collegians at Harvard next month when they accept the Man and Woman of the Year awards from the Hasty Pudding Theatricals, the nation’s oldest undergraduate drama club. The group, known for its pun-strewn, all-male drag musicals, will lead each star on a parade through the streets of Cambridge, Mass., before roasting the honorees, making them wear custom-made bras, and giving them their trophies (little brass pudding pots). Parker, who just won a Golden Globe for her work on ”Sex and the City,” will be dragged through Harvard Square on Feb. 7. Willis gets the treatment on Feb. 14, one day before the opening of his World War II drama, ”Hart’s War,” and he also gets to attend the premiere of this year’s Hasty Pudding musical, ”Snow Place Like Home.”…

Nominations for the BAFTAs, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards, show that England’s favorite films this year were mostly U.S.-financed productions starring actors from Australia and New Zealand. ”The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring” and ”Moulin Rouge” led the Brit pack with 12 nominations apiece, including best picture. Other best picture contenders were ”Amelie” (nine nominations), ”Shrek” (six nominations), and ”A Beautiful Mind” (five nominations). ”Gosford Park,” the American take on the classic English country house murder mystery genre, got nine nominations, while ”Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone” (that’s what it’s called in more literate English-speaking countries than the U.S.), the Hollywood take on the British boy wizard, got seven, and ”Bridget Jones’ Diary,” starring Texan Renee Zellweger as a quintessentially British heroine, got four. The one British-cast, mostly British-made film on the list, ”Iris,” got six nods.

The acting and directing nominees look like the usual suspects named in U.S. awards lists so far – Russell Crowe, Nicole Kidman, Sissy Spacek, Jennifer Connelly, Ron Howard, Robert Altman – with a handful of new names, including Eddie Murphy for his voiceover work in ”Shrek,” Ian McKellen for his ”Lord of the Rings” wizard, Hugh Bonneville (the uncanny ringer for Jim Broadbent who plays the younger version of his ”Iris” character), and ”Amelie” imp Audrey Tautou. Largely ignored were such U.S. critics’ favorites as ”Mulholland Drive,” ”The Royal Tenenbaums,” ”Black Hawk Down,” and ”The Man Who Wasn’t There.” BAFTA winners will be named at a ceremony on Feb. 24, exactly a month before the Oscars.