Blue Car | EW.com

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Blue CarA memory of the automobile in which a father drove away from his family provides the title for Blue Car but no hint of the power of writer-director...Blue CarDramaPT87MRA memory of the automobile in which a father drove away from his family provides the title for Blue Car but no hint of the power of writer-director...2003-05-09Regan ArnoldFrances FisherMargaret ColinRegan Arnold, Frances Fisher, Margaret ColinMiramax
Agnes Bruckner, Blue Car

(Blue Car: Rob Sweeney)

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Blue Car

Genre: Drama; Starring: Agnes Bruckner, David Strathairn, Regan Arnold, Frances Fisher, Margaret Colin; Director: Karen Moncrieff; Author: Karen Moncrieff; Release Date Limited: 05/02/2003; Runtime (in minutes): 87; MPAA Rating: R; Distributor: Miramax

A memory of the automobile in which a father drove away from his family provides the title for Blue Car but no hint of the power of writer-director Karen Moncrieff’s superb feature debut. That blue is the kind of detail Mr. Auster (David Strathairn), a married high school English teacher, encourages his talented 18-year-old student Meg (Agnes Bruckner) to develop in order to deepen as a poet. Auster’s attention, in turn, is the caring support Meg comes to crave – and, dangerously, to trust – as she struggles with her own depressed, fatherless household.

It’s high praise to compare Moncrieff with the dazzling Scottish filmmaker Lynne Ramsay (”Ratcatcher,” ”Morvern Callar”). Each has a knockout storytelling voice and works with a raw, innately feminine strength that scrubs away the soapy film from sad sagas. The bond between Meg and Auster is a marvel of believable complication; Strathairn’s portrayal of a flawed man is so moving and Bruckner’s Meg so painfully true – a breakthrough performance – that thoughts of ”Lolita” are left far behind. ”Blue Car,” an independently made film (shot in beautiful 35mm) about becoming a real artist, is at the same time a thrilling example of what it feels like to encounter a real artist at the start of her career. Here’s hoping that in her poetic future, Moncrieff will remain independent, free to deepen all the colors of her talent.