The Lost German Slave Girl | EW.com

Books

The Lost German Slave Girl In 1843, a German-American housewife strolling through New Orleans thought she spotted Salomé Müller, the long-lost daughter of her best ...The Lost German Slave GirlNonfiction In 1843, a German-American housewife strolling through New Orleans thought she spotted Salomé Müller, the long-lost daughter of her best ...2005-01-17Atlantic Monthly Press
A

The Lost German Slave Girl

Genre: Nonfiction; Author: John Bailey; Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press

In 1843, a German-American housewife strolling through New Orleans thought she spotted Salomé Müller, the long-lost daughter of her best friend. But ”Salomé” was now a slave who answered to the name Mary Miller. Could a white European immigrant girl?dark-eyed, olive-skinned, and orphaned at a tender age?have ended up a slave in the pre-Civil War South? It’s entirely possible, John Bailey argues in The Lost German Slave Girl, an engrossing, meticulous history — but that doesn’t necessarily mean it happened. The fierce debate over the mysterious slave’s identity inflamed 1840s Louisiana, and it has lost little of its fascination today.