Song for My Fathers | EW.com

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Song for My Fathers Returning to his hometown, New Orleans, Tom Sancton places his hands on Preservation Hall's wrought-iron gates and peers in, recalling a city that '...Song for My FathersNonfiction Returning to his hometown, New Orleans, Tom Sancton places his hands on Preservation Hall's wrought-iron gates and peers in, recalling a city that '...2006-06-02Other Press
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Song for My Fathers

Genre: Nonfiction; Author: Tom Sancton; Status: In Season; Publisher: Other Press

Returning to his hometown, New Orleans, Tom Sancton places his hands on Preservation Hall’s wrought-iron gates and peers in, recalling a city that ”had mostly faded into history long before Katrina struck — a victim of time, progress, and the eternal passing of generations.” TIME’s ex-Paris bureau chief (and an accomplished clarinetist) honors his father, a white writer with progressive views, and ”the mens,” the black and Creole musicians who accepted the author into their ranks. When George Lewis plays a lick and tells a young Sancton, ”Make that,” he invites him also to imagine a world beyond racism. Sancton’s prose in Song for My Fathers seduces like a good second-line parade.

Originally posted June 2 2006 — 12:00 AM EDT

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