Writers won't picket NAACP Image Awards on Fox | EW.com

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Writers won't picket NAACP Image Awards on Fox

The Writers Guild of America announced on Tuesday that it has granted an interim agreement that will allow the 39th Annual NAACP Image Awards to air live on Fox Feb. 14. The pact permits the Image Awards to hire scribes to write the show’s script, and it also means that no picketing will occur outside the Shrine Auditorium, where the ceremony will be held. This is a reversal of sorts from the decision the WGA made regarding Dick Clark Productions and the Golden Globes: DCP, which usually produces the Golden Globes for NBC, had requested a similar agreement from the WGA, so that the Globes could have aired without the fear of picket
lines, but the union denied its request.

“The Guild examines each request like this individually and no
decision is easy,” WGA West president Patric Verrone said in a
statement. “Our ultimate goal is to resolve this strike by achieving a
good contract. Because of the historic role the NAACP has played in
struggles like ours, we think this decision is appropriate to jointly
achieve our goals.”

In response, a spokesman for the Alliance of Motion Picture and
Television Producers released this statement: “The Writers Guild is
picking and choosing which awards shows will be able to go on
uninterrupted and which shows it will picket and disrupt. The Guild’s
disruption of the awards shows does a lot to hurt the creative
community in entertainment and audiences everywhere, but it does
nothing to get us closer to a negotiated settlement of this dispute.”

This is the third awards show that the WGA has allowed to go on the
air without the threat of picket lines. The union granted waivers to
the Broadcast Critics Awards, which aired earlier this month on VH1,
and the upcoming SAG Awards, which will air Jan. 27 on TBS and TNT.
Already, the People’s Choice Awards and the Globes were forced to alter
their planned shows because of the threat of WGA picketing.

It’s still unclear how the ongoing strike will affect the Oscars or,
more immediately, the Grammys on Feb. 10, though the WGA has indicated
that it will deny the music awards a waiver
to hire writers to help script that show. There’s also fear the
WGA and SAG will discourage musicians from attending the kudocast, but
so far the WGA hasn’t said whether it will picket the Grammys.

“The Guild examines each request like this individually and nodecision is easy,” WGA West president Patric Verrone said in astatement. “Our ultimate goal is to resolve this strike by achieving agood contract. Because of the historic role the NAACP has played instruggles like ours, we think this decision is appropriate to jointlyachieve our goals.”

In response, a spokesman for the Alliance of Motion Picture andTelevision Producers released this statement: “The Writers Guild ispicking and choosing which awards shows will be able to go onuninterrupted and which shows it will picket and disrupt. The Guild’sdisruption of the awards shows does a lot to hurt the creativecommunity in entertainment and audiences everywhere, but it doesnothing to get us closer to a negotiated settlement of this dispute.”

This is the third awards show that the WGA has allowed to go on theair without the threat of picket lines. The union granted waivers tothe Broadcast Critics Awards, which aired earlier this month on VH1,and the upcoming SAG Awards, which will air Jan. 27 on TBS and TNT.Already, the People’s Choice Awards and the Globes were forced to altertheir planned shows because of the threat of WGA picketing.

It’s still unclear how the ongoing strike will affect the Oscars or,more immediately, the Grammys on Feb. 10, though the WGA has indicatedthat it will deny the music awards a waiver to hire writers to help script that show. There’s also fear theWGA and SAG will discourage musicians from attending the kudocast, butso far the WGA hasn’t said whether it will picket the Grammys.

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