David E. Kelley talks life after 'Boston Legal' | EW.com

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David E. Kelley talks life after 'Boston Legal'

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Davidekelly_l
Once Boston Legal ends its run with a Dec. 8 series finale, Emmy-winning writer-producer David E. Kelley won’t have a series on TV for the first time in at least two decades. But fortunately, there’s some good news for fans of his irreverent dramedies: NBC recently scooped up his latest script—about an aging lawyer and his adult daughter who work together at a Chicago firm—for a potential Fall ’09 premiere.

“It’ll feature a cauldron of eccentric characters,” Kelley tells EW. “It’s much more of a comedy than some of my other shows. Some of the [touches] will remind you of Boston Legal and Ally McBeal, but it won’t be an issue- or case-driven show. It’s about the comedic relationship.” As is the case with most, if not all of his creations, the law “remains the best vehicle” for Kelley to explore his characters. In other words, don’t expect Kelley to pull a Tim Kring and suddenly churn out another Heroes. “[The law] is a natural for me,” Kelley says. “It’s society’s way of legislating morality. It’s a franchise that causes people to unearth their ideas and beliefs, and it’s such a natural spring board to tell stories about characters.

addCredit(“Mathew Imaging/WireImage”)

Meanwhile, Kelley just turned in the final script for Legal,
a series he never thought would make it past a couple seasons, much
less five. So what’s the story? Could rule-breaker Alan Shore (James
Spader
) finally lose his job?

“Yes…and no,” says Kelley. “That’s not a big part [of the ending].
It’s a small com­ponent that pays off a little bit in the last couple
of episodes.” And what about ongoing hints that Denny’s (William
Shatner
) mad cow disease could turn into a full-blown battle with
Alzheimer’s? “We will get into it a little bit, but whether we resolve
it, I’m not telling,” adds Kelley, who says this series-ender is one of
the very few he’s written in his career. (He wasn’t there for the last
bows of L.A. Law, Picket Fences, Chicago Hope, and Boston Public, and he never felt like The Practice ended because it spun into Legal.)

“This one feels like a finale,” Kelley promises. “There are no
nuclear devices that blow up—but if executed properly, this one could
be my favorite. It will be satisfying.”

More on Boston Legal:

Ausiello: Another Boston Legal vet returns

DVD review: Boston Legal season 1

Boston Legal renewed for fifth season

We love 1980s James Spader

Meanwhile, Kelley just turned in the final script for Legal,a series he never thought would make it past a couple seasons, muchless five. So what’s the story? Could rule-breaker Alan Shore (JamesSpader) finally lose his job?

“Yes…and no,” says Kelley. “That’s not a big part [of the ending].It’s a small com­ponent that pays off a little bit in the last coupleof episodes.” And what about ongoing hints that Denny’s (WilliamShatner) mad cow disease could turn into a full-blown battle withAlzheimer’s? “We will get into it a little bit, but whether we resolveit, I’m not telling,” adds Kelley, who says this series-ender is one ofthe very few he’s written in his career. (He wasn’t there for the lastbows of L.A. Law, Picket Fences, Chicago Hope, and Boston Public, and he never felt like The Practice ended because it spun into Legal.)

“This one feels like a finale,” Kelley promises. “There are nonuclear devices that blow up—but if executed properly, this one couldbe my favorite. It will be satisfying.”

More on Boston Legal:
Ausiello: Another Boston Legal vet returns
DVD review: Boston Legal season 1
Boston Legal renewed for fifth season
We love 1980s James Spader

Originally posted October 29 2008 — 7:26 PM EDT

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