BAFTA nominations: Winners & Losers | EW.com

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BAFTA nominations: Winners & Losers

Last year, the BAFTA nominations were the one pre-Oscar award list that matched up perfectly with the Academy’s Best Picture nominations. And in the past, BAFTA has presaged acting nominations for the likes of The Aviator’s Alan Alda. With that in mind, here are the biggest winners and losers from this morning’s nominations announcement.

WINNERS

An Education Yes, it makes sense that a smart British drama would do very well at the BAFTAs. But for An Education to tie Avatar and The Hurt Locker for the most nominations means that it’s the non-American film with the best chance at doing exceptionally well with the Academy. District 9 is a close second. Speaking of which…

District 9 Five tech nominations is one thing. But the vivid sci-fi film also made into the adapted screenplay and—most impressively—director races. Could Neill Blomkamp really score an Oscar nod too? I’d say it’s between him and Lee Daniels right now.

Alec Baldwin After being overlooked by the BFCA, SAG, and Golden Globes, the It’s Complicated scene-stealer muscled into Best Supporting Actor over Christopher Plummer and Matt Damon. With Invictus failing of late, he may be this year’s Alan Alda.

LOSERS

Invictus The Clint Eastwood drama landed on the Producers Guild top 10 but was completely shut out of the BAFTA nominations. No Morgan Freeman, no Matt Damon, nothing. Since No. 1 and No. 2 votes are the ones that will most likely count with the Academy, the film may be left out in favor of cult faves like District 9 or Star Trek. Or even The Hangover.

Helen Mirren & Christopher Plummer The Last Station pair seemed on their way to scoring Oscar nods after making the cut with the Globes and SAG. But for the Brits to ignore them means support for the film may be waning.

Jason Reitman Up in the Air landed six nominations, including Best Film and Best Adapted Screenplay, but despite earning Globe, BFCA, and DGA nods, Reitman was overlooked for directing, while Kathryn Bigelow and Lone Scherfig were included instead. If the Academy also wants to nominate two women for the first time, could he be in trouble?

Image credit: Kerry Brown