'Idol' exit Q&A: Lilly Scott on 'karaoke singers being molded into a big pop star' and her Coachella hopes | EW.com

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'Idol' exit Q&A: Lilly Scott on 'karaoke singers being molded into a big pop star' and her Coachella hopes

Lilly-Scott-Idol

Lilly-Scott-IdolImage Credit: Patrick Ecclestein/FOX As one of this season’s most unique contestants, 20-year-old Lilly Scott had high hopes of making it far. But her hopes were dashed last night after a shocking vote, leaving her publicly puzzled. ”I don’t know what America wants to hear,” she said last night. Today, EW asked about her theories on the subject and more. 

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: How are you doing?
LILLY SCOTT: Doing pretty good actually. I’m not devastated.

Yeah. Last night, I kind of felt like you weren’t ”devastated,” but maybe outraged.
I’m definitely not outraged or frustrated. I’m definitely disappointed that I didn’t make the top 12 just because I thought that I had done really well, listening to what the judges had said and how the producers had been treating me. But I don’t think my voting demographic was there.

What is that demographic in your opinion?
Definitely more of the indie, unsigned artist demographic that probably doesn’t even own a TV and is probably out riding their bikes or playing on a mountain. They’re not sitting inside watching American Idol. So I think that kind of affected me probably with votes.

You said you were kind of surprised by the vote because of the feedback you’ve been getting. What was it like off-stage after your performance on Tuesday?
Yeah. It just seemed like everything had gone swimmingly up to this point. I don’t know what really happened. I mean, every comment I would get when I performed was good, and everything off-stage was great. I don’t know, I guess the fans just weren’t there for whatever reason.

You said last night that you weren’t sure what America is looking for. What are they looking for in your opinion?
You know, I don’t know. Last night when I watched who made it into the Top 12, specific people were just bumming me out. It seemed like just another season of almost karaoke singers being molded into a big pop star. I don’t know. That was one of the reasons I tried out this season because I really wanted to break the mold and try to give some off-the-wall, different music for America to listen to. But I think staying true to myself and picking crazy songs…I don’t know. I don’t regret anything. I definitely don’t think the tween audience knows who Patsy Cline is, so that might have affected me.

What’s your next move from here?
Hopefully recording an album. I would love to get on the summer show circuit, things like Coachella and Bonnaroo. That’s definitely the market I want to be in. Hopefully, someday I’ll be able to open for people like Björk or Radiohead, major indie artists gone totally mainstream who are well recognized and respected. It’s just sort of the route I’m trying to go for. I don’t know if it was the earrings or what it was that people weren’t feeling. I don’t necessarily walk into the salon and ask for the Emmylou Harris hair. I love my hair, and I’m not going to change, maybe that’s what America didn’t want. I think American Idol every year is about turning someone into something else. And Kara came up to me after I was eliminated and said, ”Maybe America didn’t put you through because they almost think that you are almost ready as an artist and you are so sure of who you are as a person that there’s almost nothing to make of you. You’re almost ready to go.” I feel like I went out with a bang. I didn’t leave on a horrible night. I don’t know. I really wish I could have made it into the Top 12, that’s for sure.

Is that the vibe you were getting from the judges? Were they as shocked as everyone else?
You know, apparently Ellen is upset. I don’t know. I don’t know what happened. I know that the judges liked me and that the producers liked me. I was getting along with all the contestants. I was having a great time. I was being positive and cooperative and really having a great time on the show. I guess the fans didn’t get a chance to see that. I guess they’re looking for someone like Katie [Stevens] or someone like Lacey [Brown] this year. I don’t know what happened. It’s kind of a bummer.

When Katelyn got voted off – this was before you got voted off – you looked really upset. Were you two close?
Definitely. We were roommates the whole time, and she’s definitely a major thing I’ve gained from the competition. She’s a really close friend. Crystal as well, but Crystal’s doing great. But I mean, that was the thing. I was receiving just as good – if not better – comments than Crystal. They were saying I was a true artist. I don’t know, but Crystal was also playing a lot more mainstream songs.

Is there anything else you want to add about what you’ve been through or where you’re going?
Basically just that American Idol was a great stepping stone, and I’m looking forward to moving on with my career. I’m so thankful for everything I’ve gained from the show, and I’m really excited to have gained the fan base and audience from American Idol that will follow me through my career. I hope America doesn’t forget about me because I’m definitely going to pull out some crazy stuff that people will love to enjoy a lot more than cover songs.

More American Idol top 16 exit Q&As:
Todrick Hall on setting his sights on Glee
Alex Lambert on stage fright and the song he wishes he’d done
Katelyn Epperly on ‘molding myself to be something I wasn’t’

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