'The Good Wife' review: The most revealing episode to date: sex, religion, babies, and insurance | EW.com

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'The Good Wife' review: The most revealing episode to date: sex, religion, babies, and insurance

The promo ads for The Good Wife played up the “Will Alicia and Will Do It?” tease from last night’s episode. But that didn’t prepare us for this hour crammed with controversial, timely, or just plain excitable moments. Themes and subplots included insurance fraud, fetal surgery, Chris Noth’s Peter getting religion, guilt-by-Facebook, and by my count, a quadruple-twist in that Alicia-Will get-together.

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Alicia’s firm had taken on the case of a woman 23 weeks into her pregnancy who wanted

experimental surgery on her (depending on which lawyer was arguing) fetus or unborn child. Her insurance company was denying her coverage. You add guest star Martha Plimpton  being deliberately hammy as a vicious opposing lawyer nursing a sweet newborn herself, and you’ve got the elements that would take up an hour of any other series.

Not The Good Wife. It also worked in politician Peter’s cynical political move to woo a black pastor’s support because Peter is “polling poorly among black women.” He ended up on his knees in prayer with the pastor and telling one and all he sincerely wants to “change.”

Meanwhile, pushed to emotional exhaustion by the pregnancy case (well, that was the excuse, anyway), Alicia and Will kissed. Then she broke away from the embrace, left the office, got to her car and decided she liked what had happened, went back

but didn’t see Will. (God knows what part of the office he was in.) Then he called her, but she didn’t take the call. So the un-sated Alicia went home and had sex with her husband. I italicize because this was a pivotal moment for The Good Wife, a series born of the idea that the good wife was alienated from her philandering spouse. I salute the show’s producers for making this key moment seem like just part of the general messiness and confusion of Alicia’s life.

In the end, the client got her surgery via marvelously devious moves on the part of Will and Archie Panjabi’s Kalinda. But questions abound.

• Do you think Alicia will continue conjugal visits with her homebound husband?

• Has Peter truly had a conversion experience?

• Did The Good Wife coin a new term for an illicit quickie – “going back for my laptop”?

Tell me, please.

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