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Addiction television

Which recovery shows get rehabilitation right (''Intervention'') and which get it wrong (''Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew'')

With recovery shows popping up left and right, including the new TLC series Addicted, we asked board-registered interventionist (and Dr. Oz contributor) Brad Lamm (left) to give us his expert opinion on which shows get rehabilitation right and which get it wrong.

HOARDERS (A&E)
The series follows people unable to part with their belongings, resulting in family drama and illnesses. According to Lamm, however, Hoarders hurts more than it helps. ”It puts a camera in the midst of folks who have a real mental illness,” he says. ”Those people are fragile. They do an ambush intervention and exploit their pain and recovery.”

CELEBRITY REHAB WITH DR. DREW (VH1)
Dr. Drew Pinsky has the smarts but lacks the personal experience of being an addict, says a now-sober Lamm, who battled drug and alcohol addictions before friends and family staged an intervention in 2002. ”Dr. Drew is such a yahoo. I would never take a client to that treatment center. You put a paycheck and cameras in a room with addicted actors and you get a sideshow instead of rehab.”

ADDICTED (TLC)
Lamm wishes this new entry spent more time examining the toll on family members. ”Addicted tries to look at the family stories, but I think it still really glorifies the shooting up, the smoking of the pipe, and the dark spots.”

INTERVENTION (A&E)
Of all the shows, Lamm gives this series his most positive rating. ”It cheered the idea of intervention for millions who didn’t even know they could do something. Most of the other [shows] are time fillers.”