EW's Best and Worst Predictions | EW.com


EW's Best and Worst Predictions

We were right about Angelina Jolie and ''Law & Order,'' but we couldn't predict ''Titanic'' and Robert Downey Jr.

Law & Order
Our very first Fall TV Preview, in 1990, predicted that new show Law & Order had a good chance for a second season, while Cop Rock had a ”hard road” ahead of it (it was canceled after 11 episodes).

In 1995, we wrote that ”DVDs — five-inch CDs that can hold movies, games, and more — are the next step in the evolution of entertainment media.” By 2002, DVD sales had crossed the billion-unit mark.

Christian Bale
The rising actor had been cast in American Psycho when we included him in our 1999 ”It Issue.”

Angelina Jolie
Before her star-making turn in 1999’s Girl, Interrupted, we ran a profile of Angelina Jolie, who at the time was best known for her role in the HBO film Gia. Our writer thought it likely that the full-lipped beauty would soon ”move beyond the cutting edge.”

Paranormal Activity
We may have used our own supernatural powers in 2009 to predict the unexpected popularity of Paranormal Activity: ”Could the next sleeper hit be a tiny — and very scary — movie that some guy made in his own home?”

”Nirvana may not stand a chance of selling anywhere near as many records as Guns N’ Roses,” we said in a 1991 review. Never mind.

When the film got pushed back from a summer release in 1997, we thought it might be in trouble. ”Sink: James Cameron,” we wrote. ”At least his reputation.”

Yasmine Bleeth in Titans? What were we thinking? The former Baywatch star graced a 2000 cover for a totally forgettable show that got canceled before the end of its first season.

Robert Downey Jr.
”Will Hollywood give up on Robert Downey Jr.?” we asked after his arrest on Thanksgiving of 2000 for drug-related charges. ”The 35-year-old actor may have exhausted that reservoir of goodwill.”

American Idol
In a 2002 story titled ”How to Extend Reality TV’s 15 Minutes of Fame,” we were skeptical of the then-upcoming American Idol, which we called ”Fox’s warmed-over Popstars concept.”