Thanks for Sharing Movie | EW.com

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Thanks for Sharing

Thanks for SharingConsidering all of the powerful movies that have been made about booze, gambling, and drug dependencies, surely there's room for a decent one about sex...Thanks for SharingComedyPT112MRConsidering all of the powerful movies that have been made about booze, gambling, and drug dependencies, surely there's room for a decent one about sex...2013-09-25Roadside Attractions
OVERSHARING Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow star in Thanks for Sharing , which is struggles to make a serious impression

OVERSHARING Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow star in Thanks for Sharing, which is struggles to make a serious impression (Anne Joyce)

C

Thanks for Sharing

Genre: Comedy; Starring: Gwyneth Paltrow, Tim Robbins, Mark Ruffalo; Director: Stuart Blumberg; Release Date Limited: 09/20/2013; Runtime (in minutes): 112; MPAA Rating: R; Distributor: Roadside Attractions

Considering all of the powerful movies that have been made about booze, gambling, and drug dependencies, surely there’s room for a decent one about sex addiction besides Shame. Sadly, Stuart Blumberg’s Thanks for Sharing is not that film. Tracing the struggles of three men at various stages of the 12-step stations of the cross, this tone-deaf misfire can’t decide whether it wants to be a broad comedy doling out raunchy slapstick laughs or a serious drama about our porn-saturated age of sensory overload. Mark Ruffalo gets the most screen time as Adam, an environmental consultant for whom walking down the streets of Manhattan past Victoria’s Secret billboards is a one-day-at-a-time trial. Since Adam has five years of sexual sobriety under his belt, his paternal sponsor, Mike (Tim Robbins), urges him to start dating again. And he does just that after meeting cute with Gwyneth Paltrow’s flirtatious Phoebe. But she can’t wrap her head around his addiction. ”Is that even a thing?” she asks. ”Isn’t that what guys say when they get caught cheating?” While Robbins tries to heal the strained relationship with his wayward son (Patrick Fugit), a third member of the program — Josh Gad’s leering horndog Neil — keeps popping up as the butt of tin-eared fat-guy gags. His character is merely one of the film’s many wasted opportunities to say something profound. C

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