'Pride' in Pop Culture | EW.com


'Pride' in Pop Culture

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a person in want of a good project will adapt ''Pride and Prejudice'' — if not always to dazzling effect; with the two-part miniseries ''Death Comes to Pemberley'' debuting Oct. 26 on PBS, we rank the Austen adaptations

[1] Pride and Prejudice
1995 BBC Miniseries
The six-hour saga is the gold standard for faithful adaptations — maybe excepting that scene of Colin Firth in a pond (though we’re not complaining).

[2] Pride & Prejudice
2005 Movie
Purists may sniff at Keira Knightley’s tomboyish Lizzie and Matthew Macfadyen’s awkward Darcy, but they’re captivating. And his manly duster is almost as sexy as Firth’s wet shirt.

[3] Pride and Prejudice
1940 Movie
The esteemed Laurence Olivier smolders at near-Firth levels. But points docked for lack of a bathing scene, Hollywoodization of the ending.

[4] Bridget Jones’s Diary
2001 Movie
An adaptation for the Everywoman. Includes a great Darception: Bridget (Renée Zellweger) watches Firth in P&P while he plays her love interest Mark Darcy (based on the original Darcy).

[5] Longbourn
2013 Book
Author Jo Baker delves into the downstairs of the Bennet household, following the lives of their servants, who are as steeped in intrigue and heart-pounding romance as their employers.

[6] The Lizzie Bennet Diaries
2012-13 Web Series
A charming update for the social-media era, told over the course of 100 YouTube videos.

[7] Bride & Prejudice
2005 Movie
The Bollywood adaptation features the worst Darcy (sorry, Martin Henderson), but the former Miss World Aishwarya Rai glows as Lizzie.

[8] Death Comes to Pemberley
2014 Miniseries
The small-screen version of P.D. James’ Austen fanfic centers on murder most foul yet is still a snoozer.

[9] Pride and Prejudice and Zombies
2009 Book
Lizzie and Darcy had enough obstacles to their love without the undead getting in the way.

[10] Pulse and Prejudice
2012 Book
Two words: vampire Darcy.

[11] Pride & Prejudice
2009 Marvel Graphic Novels
An unnecessary (and poorly illustrated) attempt to cash in on Jane-ia (the new term I have coined for Jane Austen fever, and for which I apologize).

[12] Colin Firth as wet-shirted Darcy statue
This 12-foot fiberglass likeness rising from the waters of the Serpentine lake in Hyde Park (it now resides in Australia) is pure nightmare fuel.