Here are the top Kindle highlights from Jurassic Park and The Lost World |


Here are the top Kindle highlights from 'Jurassic Park' and 'The Lost World'

Released: June 11, 1993 Box office: $1.03 billion Just as the rippling water in one now iconic scene signaled the T. rex's grand entrance, so…

(Murray Close)

One of the strangely magical (and sort of terrifying) things about reading a Kindle ebook is being able to see which passages are most often highlighted by other readers. It’s like a mass therapy session where you can learn what most people think is important, interesting, or worth remembering. In anticipation of Jurassic World’s opening, here are the top Kindle highlights from the original books—Michael Crichton’s Jurassic Park and The Lost World:

Jurassic Park

“In the information society, nobody thinks. We expected to banish paper, but we actually banished thought.”

“Because the history of evolution is that life escapes all barriers. Life breaks free. Life expands to new territories. Painfully, perhaps even dangerously. But life finds a way.”

“A day is like a whole life. You start out doing one thing, but end up doing something else, plan to run an errand, but never get there.… And at the end of your life, your whole existence has that same haphazard quality, too. Your whole life has the same shape as a single day.”

“Most kinds of power require a substantial sacrifice by whoever wants the power. There is an apprenticeship, a discipline lasting many years. Whatever kind of power you want. President of the company. Black belt in karate. Spiritual guru. Whatever it is you seek, you have to put in the time, the practice, the effort. You must give up a lot to get it. It has to be very important to you. And once you have attained it, it is your power. It can’t be given away: it resides in you. It is literally the result of your discipline.”

“All major changes are like death,” he said. “You can’t see to the other side until you are there.”

“Life is actually a series of encounters in which one event may change those that follow in a wholly unpredictable, even devastating way.”

“Story of our species,” Malcolm said, laughing. “Everybody knows it’s coming, but not so soon.”

“Even pure scientific discovery is an aggressive, penetrative act. It takes big equipment, and it literally changes the world afterward. Particle accelerators scar the land, and leave radioactive byproducts. Astronauts leave trash on the moon. There is always some proof that scientists were there, making their discoveries. Discovery is always a rape of the natural world. Always.”

“You know what’s wrong with scientific power?” Malcolm said. “It’s a form of inherited wealth. And you know what assholes congenitally rich people are. It never fails.”

“Let’s be clear. The planet is not in jeopardy. We are in jeopardy. We haven’t got the power to destroy the planet—or to save it. But we might have the power to save ourselves.”

The Lost World

“All your life, other people will try to take your accomplishments away from you. Don’t you take it away from yourself.”

“Too much change is as destructive as too little. Only at the edge of chaos can complex systems flourish.”

“What makes you think human beings are sentient and aware? There’s no evidence for it. Human beings never think for themselves, they find it too uncomfortable. For the most part, members of our species simply repeat what they are told—and become upset if they are exposed to any different view. The characteristic human trait is not awareness but conformity, and the characteristic result is religious warfare.”

“Heisenberg uncertainty principle: that whatever you studied you also changed.”

“Human beings are so destructive,” Malcolm said. “I sometimes think we’re a kind of plague, that will scrub the earth clean. We destroy things so well that I sometimes think, maybe that’s our function. Maybe every few eons, some animal comes along that kills off the rest of the world, clears the decks, and lets evolution proceed to its next phase.”

“Anything new or unknown is automatically of interest, because it might have value. It might be worth a fortune.”

“Because raising children is, in a sense, the reason the society exists in the first place.”

“Perhaps not,” Levine said. “But absence of proof is not proof of absence.”

“the truest picture of life in the past incorporated the interplay of all aspects of life, the good and the bad, the strong and the weak. It was no good pretending anything else.”

“In evolutionary theory, this is called the Red Queen phenomenon,” Malcolm said. “Because in Alice in Wonderland the Red Queen tells Alice she has to run as fast as she can just to stay where she is. That’s the way evolutionary spirals seem. All the organisms are evolving at a furious pace just to stay in the same balance. To stay where they are.”