'Supergirl' evolving as 'Flash' crossover deadline looms | EW.com
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Supergirl evolving as Flash crossover deadline nears

(Monty Brinton/CBS)

The clock is ticking on whether Supergirl will crossover with The Flash and/or Arrow this year. DC Comics uber-producer Greg Berlanti say his teams on all three shows would need to lock down a plan with The CW and CBS within roughly a month in order to make a climatic multi-network crossover happen this season.

“I would love it, a lot of things would have to go right and people would have to say ‘Yes,’” Berlanti said. “It would have to figured out very soon. It would all have to be figured out in the next month or so. As it remains right now we’ve talked internally about how cool it would be, but we haven’t had official conversations. [The CW chief Mark Pedowitz] is supportive.”

Supergirl debuted to very strong ratings in the fall (13 million viewers, 3.1 rating among adults 18-49), then fell to more modest-yet-solid numbers (the recent midseason had 8.8 million and a 1.8 rating). We asked showrunner Andrew Kreisberg how the series is evolving for the back half of the season to perhaps regain some of the ground that slipped away.

“I’m as proud of Supergirl as anything I’ve ever done and in some ways prouder because it’s so hard to actually pull off the sheer scale of it,” Kreisberg said. “And while I’m so proud of the pilot and some of those early episodes, I do think there was an expectation of what it should be, what the ratings should be, what the character meant. And because it’s a female superhero as well, I think there were expectations on the part of the audience and the people we were making the show with. And I think it’s taken awhile to shake out. Once we stopped trying to make the show to be everything for everybody else and just started telling stories we wanted to tell with these amazing actors, the show has become a lot easier to make. We were blessed with The Flash, which came out of the gate fully formed in a way that Arrow didn’t. Arrow took awhile to find itself. Arrow needed Felicity (Emily Bett Rickards) which it didn’t have early on, and it had voiceover, which it didn’t need. Whereas The Flash came out like The Flash — you can watch the pilot and the finale back to back and it’s the same show. Supergirl was one of those shows that had a learning curve on how to make it and how to tell the stories and the audience’s part on how to watch it.”

Trying to get an example of evolution that’s more specific, I prompted: The show is at its best when…

“It’s at its best when everyone’s involved,” Kreisberg said. “In the beginning there was a lot of this person’s over here doing this thing, and this person’s doing that thing, and Kara’s got a relationship with Kat, and another relationship with Jimmy. Now things are much more integrated — and they’re going to get further integrated moving forward … but I can’t look back at the early episodes and say, ‘Gee we really blew it there,’ because I don’t think we did. I think it’s the natural evolution. Maybe there were times the storytelling was too timid, or too bold, but I can’t say we’re not being bold now. I just know in my heart the show keeps getting better, and that seems to be the general impression people are getting.”

Supergirl, airing Monday nights, has a big episode next week, titled “Childish Things,” when Winn’s (Jeremy Jordan) father, the supervillian Toyman (Henry Czerny) breaks out of prison.