Broad City finale: Abbi and Ilana discuss the future of the show | EW.com

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Broad City: Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer discuss the future of the show

Jacobson: 'At their core, they want what everyone wants. To be successful in something, in some way'

(Comedy Central)

Broad City’s third season came to an end on Wednesday, but never fear: Comedy Central picked up the show for two more seasons back in January. 

So what does the future of the show look like? In a recent interview with EW, Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer discussed their big-picture plan for the rest of the series, including their goal to make their characters (somewhat) more mature.

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: Comedy Central picked up the show for two more seasons after this one. And when the new seasons air, neither of you will be in your 20s anymore. Do you have a plan to have them grow out of their twentysomething lifestyles as the seasons go on?
ABBI JACOBSON: Well, that started this season. You have the episode where Ilana leaves her old job.
ILANA GLAZER: That’s a huge thing. What do we have in life? Work and sex.
JACOBSON: [Laughs] That’s it. No family…
GLAZER: Work, sex, and weed. So season 3, the girls finally experience consequences. And it’s about time!
JACOBSON: If we didn’t deal with consequence, it would’ve been like, you guys are lame, and you’re stagnant.  

Big-picture, what are Abbi and Ilana’s goals? Where are they headed?
JACOBSON: At their core, they want what everyone wants. To be successful in something, in some way. To continue to have relationships with more people, or just more.
GLAZER: Romantic friendships.
JACOBSON: They want what every New York transplant wants, which is to make it in New York in whatever way. I don’t know if they know what that means yet.

How many more seasons do you think is ideal to tell their story?
GLAZER: We’re still working on that. We’re wavering between two numbers.
JACOBSON: It doesn’t feel like it should exist forever. Just because of who they are, it feels like kind of a …
GLAZER: It’s supposed to capture that certain part of life. And the characters are too gross if they don’t grow beyond that point of life. So we gotta find that balance where are we going to stretch [that aspect] it out a little more, or are we going to do more accurate of life?
JACOBSON: I would never want it to go on too long where it starts to feel old and generic.

As you grow in real life, is it a challenge to keep the show so in tune with the times?
GLAZER: Oh, yeah. I’m already too f—ing old.
JACOBSON: We’re way too old.
GLAZER: It’s over.
JACOBSON: We are, but at the same time we’re not, because “cool” now is different … I think cool now is, like, being into stuff.
GLAZER: Sincerity.
JACOBSON: So it’s cool for you to really like old people, you know what I mean? So I think you can be old and cool.
GLAZER: But it’s like, How long can you be the hot young thing? Not long, baby! Not long — the industry hate old. They hate old. So whatever, we’ll be, like, staples? You can’t be the hot young thing forever.

Would there ever be a Broad City movie?
GLAZER: I don’t think it’d be Abbi and Ilana. I think Broad City is so perfectly Broad City, you know?
JACOBSON: It’d be different characters.
GLAZER: But, like, barely. It’d be unnoticeable-amount different.

A version of this story originally appeared in Entertainment Weekly issue #1408–1409, available here.