Ricky Martin mourns Orlando massacre victims in powerful essay | EW.com

Music

Ricky Martin mourns Orlando massacre victims in powerful essay

'I am in pain, I am sad, I am angry,' he wrote

(Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

Ricky Martin mourned the victims of Sunday’s Orlando, Florida massacre – where a single gunman killed 49 people and injured 53 at a gay nightclub during its Latin Night – in an essay titled “I Will Never Cease to Fight for Love.”

“The tragedy that occurred in Orlando hurts me in so many ways,” Martin wrote. “It hurts me as a man, as a human being, and as a gay person, because so many of the victims were brothers and sisters of the LGBT community.”

Martin came out as gay in a letter that he posted on his official website in 2010. “I am proud to say that I am a fortunate homosexual man,” he said in that note. “I am very blessed to be who I am.” In this recent essay, he mentions how the media is “describing this act as a hate crime and an act of terrorism,” and how he feels “the purpose of this senseless act seems clear: to strike terror in the LGBT community.”

“Waves of fear have been spread throughout the LGBT community and our society as a whole,” he wrote after Orlando. “The LGBT community is the latest target of such violence that has included, among others, journalists, office workers, and travelers. Yet, I ask that we stand strong and not give in to fear. We must be unified and bonded by these horrific, cowardly acts designed to silence and suppress us. We cannot allow for hate to win, and we cannot stay quiet and hide.”

He goes on to call for stricter gun laws and requests readers to step in. “I ask you to BREAK YOUR SILENCE and call each and every one of your congressman — those you elected into power to represent you and your ideals — 10 times each day until they act,” he said. “And most importantly LOVE. Love with all your heart … I have faith in humanity. I refuse to accept that this is the world my children will inherit. I will never cease to fight for love.”

Read both the English and Spanish versions of Martin’s essay below.

English:

Although I am out of the country my heart is in Orlando. I still cannot believe that an individual filled with so much hate killed 49 people and injured 53 on June 12th. People that unlike him were celebrating love, freedom and life. I try to find calmness within, so that I can properly express my current state of mind in this article and share with you how I feel during this important mourning process. The tragedy that occurred in Orlando hurts me in so many ways. It hurts me as a man, as a human being, and as a gay person, because so many of the victims were brothers and sisters of the LGBT community.  I am in pain, I am sad, I am angry. 

As I read the newspapers and watch the newscasts, the media is describing this act as a hate crime and an act of domestic terrorism. Many sources say this individual visited the club frequently in the last year. Some deduce that this was an act of “internalized homophobia,” which is when a lesbian, gay, bisexual or transsexual feels hatred for their own community. 

Nonetheless, the purpose of this senseless act seems clear: to strike terror in the LGBT community and to our society which value basic freedoms and civil rights for all; and to spew hatred in the largest mass shooting in U.S. history. It has also proven that gun laws MUST change in this country. However, my faith in humanity is greater than all of this. I do believe that love conquers all, but I also believe we need to join together and end this hatred.

So why were these 102 people shot? Because of who they love? Because they were celebrating their equality and civil rights? What were these people doing that was so awful that a man would drive to Orlando, Florida with an AR-15-style assault rifle and a handgun invigorated with the desire to kill as many from this community as his bullets and time would allow him? As I watch the news and see the mothers, fathers, family members and friends grieving this senseless act, my heart aches. I cannot fight the tears as I read the pleas sent by the victims through texts to their loved ones minutes before their executions. Waves of fear have been spread throughout the LGBT community and our society as a whole. The LGBT community is the latest target of such violence that has included, among others, journalists, office workers and travelers. Yet, I ask that we stand strong and not give in to fear. We must be unified and bonded by these horrific, cowardly acts designed to silence and suppress us. We cannot allow for hate to win, and we cannot stay quiet and hide.

It seems recent headlines are increasingly filled with hatred and intolerance. We have grown as a society by moving towards greater inclusiveness, empathy, and acceptance, and we must continue down that path and always reject divisiveness and animosity. The United States is strongest rooted firmly in a foundation constructed on beliefs of freedom; whose laws are built to leave behind regimes that suffocate individuality; a country that welcomes differences and realizes its greatness resides in its people. These are ideals we strive for in the never-ending pursuit to build a better world. We often struggle in this pursuit, but we should never be deterred from the ongoing mission. This inexplicable tragedy in Orlando is a perfect example of why it is wrong for people with power to use hate and fear to headline their religious and political rhetoric. We as a society must never turn our heads or find it acceptable for hate, racism, and bigotry to become a part of our every day conversations. This was a man that allowed hatred to consume him to the point that he killed 49 men and women that were doing nothing else but proudly living a dignified life.  It’s time to change the conversation. We need to speak a language of love and openly reject hate no matter where it comes from.

Today, too many people continue to defend the indefensible. There are a series of issues in play here, but the United States of America has an undeniable problem with gun violence. How many more lives need to be lost before we do something about lax gun laws? How can a person previously tied to terrorism and interviewed by the FBI on several occasions be permitted to work as a security guard and still have the ability to legally purchase guns? How can we continue to stand by an amendment ratified in 1791 to justify an incomprehensible proliferation of firearms in the U.S? You know what else was permitted in 1791? Slavery, dueling as a way of settling arguments, consensual sex with children above 10 in most states (Delaware was 7), wife beating as a valid exercise of a husband’s authority over his wife, and the list of absurdities goes on and on. Today, we know better as a society. We are more civilized. As President Obama stated, “To actively do nothing is a decision as well.” People continue to say it is their right to bear arms. What about our right to feel safe?

I ask you to BREAK YOUR SILENCE and call each and every one of your congressman - those you elected into power to represent you and your ideals - 10 times each day until they act. Set a timer if it helps, but make the calls. And most importantly LOVE. Love with all your heart. Love those close to you, and those you don’t even know. Be kind, be empathetic, be compassionate, be generous. Fill your life and words with nothing but love. I have faith in humanity. I refuse to accept that this is the world my children will inherit. I will never cease to fight for love.

Spanish: 

Aunque estoy fuera del país, mi corazón está en Orlando. Todavía no puedo creer que este individuo era un hombre tan lleno de odio, que el pasado 12 de junio asesinó a 49 personas e hirió a otras 53. Personas que, a diferencia de él, celebraban el amor, la libertad y la vida. En mi corazón intento buscar la calma necesaria para poder desahogarme a través de este artículo y compartir con ustedes mi sentir en medio de este tan importante proceso del luto. La tragedia ocurrida en Orlando me duele de tantas formas. Me duele como hombre, como ser humano, como persona gay, porque tantas de las víctimas eran hermanos y hermanas de la comunidad LGBT. Esto provoca en mí dolor, tristeza e indignación.

Cuando leo los periódicos y miro los noticieros, los medios describen este acto como un delito motivado por el odio y un atentado terrorista propio. Varias fuentes indican que este individuo visitó esta discoteca con frecuencia el último año. Algunos deducen que fue un acto motivado por la “homofobia internalizada”, que es cuando una persona lesbiana, gay, bisexual o transexual siente odio por su propia comunidad.

Sin embargo, el propósito de este acto absurdo queda claro: sembrar el terror en la comunidad LGBT y en nuestra sociedad, que valora las libertades básicas y los derechos civiles para todos, y diseminar el odio mediante el mayor tiroteo masivo en la historia de Estados Unidos. Este hecho también ha demostrado que en este país las leyes de armas de fuego TIENEN que cambiar. Sin embargo, mi fe en la humanidad es mayor que todo esto. Sí creo que el amor es capaz de superarlo todo, pero también creo que tenemos que unirnos y ponerle fin a este odio.

Entonces ¿por qué recibieron disparos estas 102 personas? ¿A causa de a quién eligieron amar? ¿Porque estaban celebrando su igualdad y sus derechos civiles? ¿Qué cosas tan terribles estaban haciendo para que un hombre sintiera la necesidad de manejar en automóvil hasta Orlando, Florida, con un rifle de asalto estilo AR-15 y un arma de fuego estimulado por el deseo de matar a tantas personas de esta comunidad como le permitieran las balas y el tiempo? Cuando veo en las noticias el sufrimiento de las madres, los padres, los familiares y los amigos por este acto sin sentido, siento dolor en mi corazón. No puedo contener las lágrimas cuando leo las súplicas enviadas por las víctimas por mensajes de texto a sus seres queridos minutos antes de ser ejecutados a sangre fría. Se ha extendido una oleada de miedo por toda la comunidad LGBT y en nuestra sociedad en general. La comunidad LGBT es el blanco más reciente de este tipo de violencia, que ha incluido, entre otros, a periodistas, empleados de oficina y viajeros. Aún así, les pido que seamos fuertes y no nos rindamos ante el miedo. Estos actos horribles y cobardes, diseñados para silenciarnos y reprimirnos, nos deben unir aún más. No podemos permitir que el odio triunfe, y no podemos quedarnos callados y escondernos.Pareciera que los titulares más recientes están cada vez más llenos de odio e intolerancia. Hemos crecido como sociedad al acercarnos a una mayor inclusión, solidaridas y aceptación, y tenemos que seguir por ese camino y rechazar siempre la división y el resentimiento. Estados Unidos es más fuerte cuando se afirma sólidamente en sus cimientos erigidos sobre la fe en la libertad; cuyas leyes se han forjado para poner distancia de los regímenes que sofocan la individualidad; un país que acepta las diferencias con los brazos abiertos y es consciente de que su grandeza está en su gente. Estos son ideales por los que luchamos en el interminable empeño de construir un mundo mejor. A menudo enfrentamos dificultades en nuestro empeño, pero nunca debemos desistir de completar esta misión. Esta inexplicable tragedia en Orlando es el perfecto ejemplo de por qué no es correcto que las personas en el poder utilicen el odio y el miedo para enfatizar su retórica política y religiosa. Como sociedad nunca debemos ignorar o aceptar que el odio, el racismo y la intolerancia se conviertan en parte de nuestras conversaciones diarias. Este individuo era un hombre que permitió que el odio lo consumiera hasta el punto de asesinar a 49 hombres y mujeres que no hacían más que vivir orgullosamente una vida digna. Es hora de reorientar la conversación. Tenemos que hablar un lenguaje de amor y rechazar abiertamente el odio, venga de donde venga. Actualmente, demasiada gente sigue defendiendo lo indefendible. Hay varias cuestiones en juego en esta situación, pero lo que no podemos negar es que Estados Unidos tiene un problema con la violencia provocada por armas de fuego. ¿Cuántas vidas más hay que sacrificar para que hagamos algo acerca de nuestra tan débil legislación vigente sobre armas de fuego? ¿Cómo es posible que a una persona previamente vinculada al terrorismo e interrogada en varias ocasiones por el FBI se le permita trabajar como guardia de seguridad y además tenga la posibilidad de adquirir legalmente armas de fuego? ¿Cómo podemos seguir afirmando una enmienda ratificada en 1791 para justificar una inconcebible proliferación de armas de fuego en Estados Unidos? ¿Saben qué más estaba permitido en el año 1791? La esclavitud, los duelos a muerte como una forma lícita de resolver desacuerdos, el sexo consensual con niños mayores de 10 años en la mayoría de los estados (en Delaware, con niños mayores de 7 años), golpear a las esposas como una muestra válida de la autoridad de los maridos sobre ellas, y una lista prácticamente interminable de otros absurdos. Actualmente, somos más sensatos como sociedad. Somos más civilizados. Como señaló Presidente Obama: “No hacer nada a sabiendas también es una decisión”. La gente sigue diciendo que portar armas es su derecho. ¿Y qué pasa con nuestro derecho a sentirnos seguros?

Les pido que ROMPAN EL SILENCIO y llamen a todos y a cada uno de sus congresistas (a esos a quienes les votaron para que los representen, a ustedes y a sus ideales) 10 veces al día hasta que hagan algo. Pongan una alarma en su reloj para no olvidarse, si es necesario, pero llámenlos. Por último, no dejen de AMAR. Amen con todo su corazón. Amen a aquellos que están cerca de ustedes y a aquellos que ni siquiera conocen. Sean amables, comprensivos, compasivos, generosos. Llenen sus vidas y sus palabras únicamente con amor. Tengo fe en la humanidad. Me niego a aceptar que este es el mundo que mis hijos heredarán. Nunca dejaré de luchar por el amor.