Author

Christopher Vaughn

Like both chitlins and caviar, Kitt is an acquired taste. Either you savor her stylized purring, or you can’t digest her exaggerated mannerisms and off-pitch voice. Orson Welles called her ”the most exciting woman in the world,” but this concert, taped in Germany, will disappoint even avid fans. Technically, Eartha Kitt: The Most Exciting Woman in the World looks and sounds low-budget; artistically, it offers no insight into either the material or the woman.

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In the black neighborhoods of Harlem, Compton, and points in between, juice equals respect, which equals power. And one sure way for a 16-year-old guy to get it is to commit two cold-blooded murders within five minutes — even if one of the victims is a childhood friend. That kind of violence and street thinking flows freely through Juice; unfortunately, the movie is bogged down by stilted dialogue and an uninteresting story.

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To commemorate Black History Month, Columbia TriStar is releasing two collections: one featuring movies by black filmmakers or about black historical figures, Black History Collection. The other showcasing Sidney Poitier in The Poitier Collection. Unfortunately, they appear to be culled with little thought, treating the occasion more as a marketing peg than a celebration of black cinema.

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To commemorate Black History Month, Columbia TriStar is releasing two collections: one featuring movies by black filmmakers or about black historical figures, Black History Collection. The other showcasing Sidney Poitier. Unfortunately, they appear to be culled with little thought, treating the occasion more as a marketing peg than a celebration of black cinema.

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Four ''blaxploitation'' films on home video

Four ”blaxploitation” films on home video

By the end of the year, more than a dozen films by black directors will have opened in movie theaters — from Spike Lee’s upcoming Jungle Fever to 19-year-old Matty Rich’s much-anticipated Straight Out of Brooklyn. The last time this many African-Americans were working in movies was during the ”blaxploitation” boom in the 1970s, when heroes and heroines such as Shaft, Superfly, and Cleopatra Jones kicked butt in the name of truth, justice, and American currency.

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Robert Townsend resurrects his flagging film's fortunes

Although Twentieth Century Fox’s publicity-hype machine operated at full speed before the opening of The Five Heartbeats, the Robert Townsend film garnered less than spectacular reviews and only $1.6 million at the box office its first weekend (March 29). A few days after the debut, rumors were rampant that the studio was preparing to pull the movie from theaters. The disappointed Townsend refused to give up hope. He and his supporters mounted a grass-roots campaign to help the film find its audience.

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