Author

Erica K. Cardozo

In New York City, Linda Fairstein is already well known as the longtime head of the district attorney’s high-profile sex crimes unit — which just happens to be the job she’s given to Alex Cooper, the heroine of this, her debut thriller. The plot here is standard-issue whodunit: Starlet Isabella Lascar is staying at Alex’s Martha’s Vineyard cottage when she is shot dead. The cops fear Alex may be next and assign her bodyguards, including her old detective pal (and fellow Jeopardy! nut) Mike Chapman, who fulfills the flirtatious Neanderthal sidekick role.

Read Full Story

Bestsellers jump-start an author's career

It didn’t exactly have megaseller written all over it: a simile-packed tale of a ”hive-spangled,” ”third-rate newspaperman” with a ”monstrous” chin who journeys to his ancestral home in Newfoundland. And sales were modest for E. Annie Proulx’s The Shipping News until — a year after it was published — the novel nabbed the Pulitzer Prize. From there, it hit No. 1 on the New York Times paperback best-seller list, sold over a million copies, and made its author a household name. And Proulx isn’t alone.

Read Full Story

That’s Beauty as in the Beast’s better-looking half, the Disney movie, the Broadway musical, and the novel by Madame LePrince de Beaumont. In this updated, ’90s version, lovely Boston artist Alix Miller journeys in her father’s stead to a remote New Hampshire manse to paint one Lee Crompton, thus repeating history: ”For centuries…the aristocratic Crompton family has sat for formal portraits painted by Miller artists….long-nosed, high-browed, blue-eyed faces….” Um, not exactly.

Read Full Story

Lia Matera’s latest Willa Jansson mystery boasts an energetic, though improbable, setup: San Francisco attorney Jansson comes to the rescue of an elderly, gun-toting family friend, whose assistant — a shaman named Billy Seawuit — has just been murdered. Suspects include Willa’s septuagenarian pal, the head of a local tech company who hired Seawuit as a consultant and his Amazonian wife, and, oh yes, the demigod Pan. It ends up being much ado about little, all set to a loopy New Age beat (get ready for drumming-induced vision questing).

Read Full Story

O.J. book contracts

Less than two weeks after prosecutors Marcia Clark ($4.2 million) and Christopher Darden ($1.3 million) made publishing headlines, two members of O.J. Simpson’s defense team sold the rights to their stories. Johnnie Cochran will earn more than $2.5 million from Ballantine for My Journey to Justice, and Robert Shapiro will get $1.5 million from Warner Books for The Search for Justice. As for O.J., he has yet to sign a deal for his account of the trial.

Read Full Story

You’d probably think that a book about a gifted child actor who grows up to graduate from Yale, make headlines as the object of John Hinckley Jr.’s obsession in the 1981 assassination attempt on Ronald Reagan, win two Oscars, become a director, and preside over her own production company — all by the time she is 30 — would be difficult to put down. Think again.

Read Full Story

Looking ahead to summer 1997

Summer movie season 1997 doesn’t kick off for 643 days — give or take — but in Hollywood, the future is now for two action giants: a Jurassic Park sequel and a fourth Batman. Michael Crichton’s much anticipated The Lost World is scheduled to hit bookstores Sept. 28. With its arrival, says Marvin Levy, an Amblin spokesman, screenwriting can begin in anticipation of a summer 1996 shoot. Steven Spielberg is considering directing.

Read Full Story
Page: