Author

Tim Carvell

Here's Jerry Lewis' 1972 ''buried treasure''

Perhaps the most famous unreleased film of all time, this 1972 tragicomedy tells the story of Helmut Doork, an embittered German clown who is sent to a Nazi death camp for lampooning Hitler. While there, he befriends the camp’s children, who restore his desire to entertain. In the film’s finale, he is coerced into leading the children into the gas chamber, where he winds up being exterminated alongside them.

Read Full Story

Here's Lorne Michaels' 1982 ''buried treasure''

When MGM gave him a deal to produce feature films in the early 1980s, Saturday Night Live creator Lorne Michaels turned to Tom Schiller, who’d made a series of well-regarded shorts for the show. But despite cameos from Dan Aykroyd and Bill Murray, Nothing Lasts Forever is anything but an SNL sketch film. Instead, it’s a deadpan, cerebral comedy, filmed in the style of 1940s B movies, about a young man (Zach Galligan) who travels beneath New York City and to the moon — via bus — to find his true love.

Read Full Story

Finding CEO

Michael Eisner looks pained and uncomfortable. Granted, Michael Eisner always looks pained and uncomfortable. But these days he’s got a good excuse: His job could be on the line with Comcast’s proposed takeover of Disney. Here’s our take on who could wear the mouse ears well.

STEPHEN BURKE Comcast exec VP, former Disney exec PROS He got EuroDisney on track. If he can sell Parisians on Big Thunder Mountain, he can do it all! CONS He doesn’t watch TV. But since According to Jim’s unwatchable, that’s okay.

Read Full Story

Imagine: A World Without the Beatles

The recent Ashton Kutcher film The Butterfly Effect begins with the assertion that a butterfly flapping its wings in China can cause a tidal wave in New York. Assuming that this is true – always a dicey proposition when it comes to scientific theories promulgated by Ashton Kutcher films – we can reasonably infer two things: The first is that we really should do something about those Chinese butterflies; the second is that small changes can have huge consequences. And so we began to wonder: What would the world have been like had the Beatles never made it?

Read Full Story

Ten celeb reality shows we'd like to see

Anna Nicole Smith
Ten celeb reality shows we’d like to see

Now that ”The Simple Life”’s stellar run has come to an end, no doubt executives at all the major networks are eagerly rushing to duplicate its ”celebrity fish out of water” formula. And – since we at Entertainment Weekly are nothing if not eager to do the networks’ work for them, free of charge, without so much as a thank you – we’ve compiled just a handful of possible celeb reality shows to fill that niche. You’re welcome.

Read Full Story

Johnny Depp is one of our Entertainers of the Year

Johnny Depp is one of our Entertainers of the Year

Doesn’t Johnny Depp know anything? Doesn’t he know that there are two types of performers – actors and stars – and that he belongs to the former category? Actors appear in independent, impenetrable movies as dark, tortured geniuses. They are adored by critics and shunned by audiences. They live in France. They do not – repeat, do not – show up in movies with the name ”Bruckheimer” in the credits. Especially not if that movie is based on a Disney theme-park ride.

Read Full Story

Newton's/Laws (of) Emotion

Wayne Newton is angry with me. He gets angry with me every night at 8:27 p.m., except Fridays, because Fridays are his night off.

Technically, he’s not so much angry with me as with a whole roomful of people. And not so much angry as disappointed. And not so much disappointed as pretending to be disappointed. But still, whatever the terminology, he’s sufficiently vexed, or fake vexed, to stop singing ”Fly Me to the Moon.”

Read Full Story

Triumph Sings the Blues

Triumph the Insult Comic Dog had been up since 4 p.m., and now, as the sky over the Sunset Strip turned the color of dried blood, his hangover was finally wearing off. Standing in a corner at Bar Marmont, a glass of bourbon in his paw, he offered a running commentary on his fellow imbibers for the benefit of the pair of blond would-be actresses who flanked him. ”Sigourney Weaver looks great,” he said.

Read Full Story

”Little Shop of Horrors” has always been an odd musical. It’s not just that it’s based on a 1960 Roger Corman horror flick, or that it revolves around a nebbishy flower-shop worker named Seymour, his tawdry but good-hearted girl, Audrey, and the man-eating plant that eventually devours them both. No, the strangest aspect of ”Little Shop” is that just barely beneath the surface beats a sentimental heart. It never condescends to its characters or reduces them to cartoons; it has the goofy spirit of camp, but not its chilly superiority.

Read Full Story
Page: