Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price With little fanfare, Robert Greenwald has become one of the most incisive activist filmmakers in America. Like his superb eve-of-the-election docs, Uncovered: The War on… Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price With little fanfare, Robert Greenwald has become one of the most incisive activist filmmakers in America. Like his superb eve-of-the-election docs, Uncovered: The War on… 2005-11-04 Unrated PT97M Documentary Brave New Films
Movie Review

Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price (2005)

MPAA Rating: Unrated
Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price | WHAT'S IT GOING TO 'COST' US? A Chicago resident puts his foot down when it comes to Wal-Mart
WHAT'S IT GOING TO 'COST' US? A Chicago resident puts his foot down when it comes to Wal-Mart
EW's GRADE
A-

Details Release Date: Nov 04, 2005; Rated: Unrated; Length: 97 Minutes; Genre: Documentary; Distributor: Brave New Films

With little fanfare, Robert Greenwald has become one of the most incisive activist filmmakers in America. Like his superb eve-of-the-election docs, Uncovered: The War on Iraq and Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism, Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price is an investigative outcry driven by stringent reporting rather than attitude. Mixing statistics and employee testimony, Greenwald details business practices that provoke a gathering outrage: the coerced unpaid overtime, the foreign sweatshop labor, the health-insurance packages (now being upgraded) that have left thousands of employees to rely on Medicaid, the sucking dry of mom-and-pop stores. Greenwald floats the vital issue of whether Wal-Mart should be restrained by antimonopoly regulations, but his real question is cultural: Even with its rock-bottom prices, is Wal-Mart in the best interest of American consumers?

Originally posted Nov 02, 2005 Published in issue #849 Nov 11, 2005 Order article reprints