New York Doll If you're going to make an entire documentary about a bass player, you could probably do worse than Arthur "Killer" Kane, who glowered like Lurch… New York Doll If you're going to make an entire documentary about a bass player, you could probably do worse than Arthur "Killer" Kane, who glowered like Lurch… 2005-10-28 PG-13 Unrated PT75M Documentary First Independent Pictures
Movie Review

New York Doll (2005)

MPAA Rating: Unrated, PG-13
New York Doll | FORMER 'DOLL' Kane
Image credit: New York Doll: Greg Whiteley
FORMER 'DOLL' Kane
EW's GRADE
B

Details Limited Release: Oct 28, 2005; Rateds: PG-13, Unrated; Length: 75 Minutes; Genre: Documentary; Distributor: First Independent Pictures

If you're going to make an entire documentary about a bass player, you could probably do worse than Arthur ''Killer'' Kane, who glowered like Lurch in a dress as he played with those seminal lipstick-punk glamsters, the New York Dolls. Three decades after the group's breakup, Kane, in L.A., is a recovering alcoholic and middle-aged nonentity. He says that he has saved himself by becoming a Mormon, yet he remains haunted by demons of failure. Preparing for a reunion concert with surviving Dolls David Johansen and Sylvain Sylvain, Kane, looking like a bedraggled Liam Neeson, must conquer his jealousy. This makes for a modestly touching journey, but New York Doll, in its wafer-thin way, is an oxymoron: a hagiographic tribute to a rocker with more passion than talent.

Originally posted Nov 02, 2005 Published in issue #849 Nov 11, 2005 Order article reprints