The Q&A

The Naked Truth

At the New York premiere of ''Basic Instinct 2'' (opening March 31), Sharon Stone chatted about her nude scenes, her political activism, and more

Sharon Stone | ROLLING STONE Sharon discusses her latest movie, politics, and what's next
Image credit: Sharon Stone: Johnny Nunez/WireImage.com
ROLLING STONE Sharon discusses her latest movie, politics, and what's next

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What made you want to reprise your role as lethal seductress Catherine Tramell for this sequel?
SHARON STONE: Well, this was a beautiful script — a beautiful, interesting script, and whether it's this movie or any movie, it's all about the script.

What do fans yell out at you these days?
They go, ''Shay-ron, Shay-ron!'' Oh, that's Europe. Here, they're like, ''Sharon!'' And they're usually like, ''Take off your coat! Take off your glasses!'' I'm like, ''It's 40 [degrees]. Take off your own coat!''

How difficult is it to do a nude scene?
It isn't. It's just like dance scenes or fight scenes. You just choreograph them and do them with humor and kindness toward your costar.

What goes on in your mind when people ask you about those sort of things, instead of about the rest of the movie?
It's all a part of the movie, and you have to expect that people are going to focus on that, because it makes them interested, and excited and embarrassed, and they want to deal with their feelings, so they address them on you.

What's your next project?
I don't know. We're going to be opening Bobby [Emilio Estevez's film about the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy] and Alpha Dog [a Sundance favorite costarring Justin Timberlake and opening in May], and I'm talking to someone about something kind of exciting, but I don't know until next week.

Tell us a little about your recent political activism.
I decided that I would like to make an initiative about peace. And I started traveling around and giving talks on the subject of peace. Because what is peace? I think people don't know what it really means.... People think it's something far away, on a shelf, that some politician is going to give them. So I started traveling, and I went to the Czech Republic... And I was invited to Italy and I spoke there on behalf of the United Nations with the Italian president. I was given the Harvard Humanitarian Award and spoke in Harvard Yard.

Then I got a letter from Shimon Peres — how would I like to come to Israel and speak there on behalf of the Peres Peace Foundation, 20 days before the election? Which was for me an enormous honor, but of course quite overwhelming. But I decided to accept because this is, in fact, one of the places in the world where peace is the most interesting and provocative subject. So off I went, and I spoke not just to Israelis but to a mixture of Israeli and Palestinian women. I spoke at the Colon Women's Conference on the subject of economics and women in the future. I taught a master class in acting, where people wanted to understand true acting; how could they most affect the world on the subject of peace?... I spoke to mostly young journalists about how effective they can be. It's humanity that inspired all of us. Not just bright lights, but humanity.

Originally posted Mar 28, 2006
Advertisement

From Our Partners