Jumpin' Jack Flash

REEL DEALS Looks like Edward Norton will star opposite Anthony Hopkins in ''Red Dragon,'' based on the first novel in Thomas Harris' Hannibal Lecter trilogy. Norton would play Will Graham, the FBI agent who captured Hopkins' Lecter and needs his help to find another serial killer. (Harris fans know the book was filmed before as ''Manhunter'' in 1986, with ''CSI: Crime Scene Investigation'' star William Petersen as Graham and Brian Cox as Lecter.) Emily Watson is also in talks to costar as a blind damsel in distress. Brett Ratner (the ''Rush Hour'' movies) will direct, with shooting set to start in November for a release next summer....

Michael Douglas is developing an adaptation of Arthur Miller's play ''The Ride Down Mount Morgan,'' which he would produce and star in. He's looking to have Milos Forman direct. Douglas coproduced the Forman-directed ''One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest'' in 1975, for which both men won Oscars.

'BUBBLE' TROUBLE Disney's comedy ''Bubble Boy,'' which opens next week, may get some laughs out of its story of a teen with a vulnerable immune system who hits the road inside a protective suit in search of his childhood sweetheart, but real-life kids with such immune deficiencies and their parents are not laughing. ''It's called a comedy, but we don't think it's funny to make jokes about serious diseases,'' wrote 10-year-old Scott McGuire in a letter to Disney chief Michael Eisner. ''It would make me really sad to think while I am at the hospital, lots of people are sitting in a movie theater laughing about a serious disease.'' Carol Ann Demaret, mother of the boy who inspired ''The Boy in the Plastic Bubble,'' the 1976 TV movie starring John Travolta, is also starting a letter-writing campaign urging Disney to withdraw the film.

TUBE TALK Sandra Bullock is returning to TV (remember the sitcom version of ''Working Girl''?), this time as a producer. She and ''The Drew Carey Show'' creator Bruce Helford are coproducing ''The George Lopez Show,'' which will star comedian and radio host Lopez as a working-class family man. Bullock signed on after she caught Lopez's stand-up routine. ABC has ordered 13 episodes of the series, which may debut this winter as a midseason replacement.

In addition to ''George Lopez,'' which would be the first broadcast network sitcom in four years with a Latino star, ABC is also home to ''My Wife and Kids,'' which stars and is produced by a black performer, Damon Wayans. Still, the NAACP singled out ABC as the network that had made the least progress in hiring minorities in front of and behind the camera, in a report released yesterday. Not that the civil rights organization thought any of the networks had shown much improvement in the two years since it blasted what it saw as TV's ''virtual whitewash.'' Said NAACP president Kweisi Mfume, ''I still can't understand why, after 50 years of television, there aren't any African-Americans who can greenlight a show, hire or fire a director, or make any real decisions.'' The group renewed its threat of a boycott of one of the networks and its sponsors. Because the threat two years ago was so effective....

''Manhunt,'' UPN's reality show involving contestants pursued by paintball-gun wielding hunters in Hawaii, is being charged with fakery by one of its former producers. Bob Jaffe, who left the show in March, says Paramount Television asked him to rig two challenges, change the rules, and reshoot some scenes, with a script, in Los Angeles. Jaffe's charges were unearthed by freelance journalist Peter Lance, author of the ''Survivor'' tell-all ''Stingray,'' and adviser to ''Survivor'' exile Stacey Stillman in her fraud lawsuit against CBS. Booted ''Manhunt'' contestant Jacqueline Kelly also says she was asked to do the reshoots. ''I said I wasn't going to participate in fraud,'' she told E! ''The game ended in Kauai. Anything after that is fraudulent.'' But she says producers threatened to withhold prize money, and the other 12 contestants capitulated. Paramount denies the allegations and says they're the product of a disgruntled ex-employee (Jaffe) who did not quit but was fired....

The WB is off to see the wizard. The network is developing a fantasy series based on the 16 Oz books by Dorothy and Toto's creator, L. Frank Baum, as well as the 29 other Oz books that followed. ''X-Men'' screenwriter David Hayter will write the pilot, setting the tone for a show somewhat darker than the 1939 Judy Garland movie classic. The project has been gestating for years, with Tim Burton attached at one point. During that time, of course, HBO came out with its own ''Oz,'' the graphically violent series set in a prison. Joel Smith, producer of the WB's kid-friendly show, says, ''I thought about calling it 'Oz: Not The Homoerotic Show,' because I was annoyed they took our title, but I guess we'll have to call it 'Tales of Oz.'''...

Former ''3rd Rock from the Sun'' alien French Stewart has a couple of small-screen projects lined up. He's signed a development deal with Fox to develop a sitcom for 2002, and he's starring in Disney's direct-to-video ''Inspector Gadget 2.''

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