Stephenie Meyer's 'Twilight' Zone

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: What do you listen to when you're writing?
STEPHENIE MEYER: [For a while], it was almost exclusively Linkin Park. Linkin Park is fantastic for action scenes, because it just has that beat that drives the momentum of the writing. [Writing] New Moon, I listened to a lot more Muse all the time. Muse is my favorite band, and they're really good for writing because they've got an angsty kind of emotion. The new book [Eclipse] was perky; I listened to OK Go and Gomez.

You're so prolific, yet you're raising three kids too. What's your day to day like?
It's kind of weird. Everything's been shifting. The boys are getting older now, and they're a lot more self sufficient, and they don't always want to hang out with mom. So that frees up some writing time, and for the first time this fall, I'll have all three of my kids in all-day school. So that's just going to be an amazing amount of time, I can barely compute it.

Given how fast you write, they better get the presses ready.
[Laughs] Sometimes it also makes me nervous. [My fans] count on me to be a fast writer, with a once-a-year release schedule, which, you know, isn't entirely fair. I mean, how long did they give J.K. Rowling? [Laughs] She gets a good couple of years between her books, and [Eragon author] Christopher Paolini gets two or three, too. But I know fans want [the new books], and you wanna give them what they want.

Your next book, set for next spring, is The Host, which you've described as possibly the first love triangle that involves only two bodies. It's also being billed as your first adult book.
It is, but it's not really any different. I didn't write Twilight thinking, ''Oh, I will appeal to 16 year olds with this.'' I don't believe that you need to write down to teenagers. When I was a teenager, all I read was adult novels. My favorite books back then were Pride and Prejudice and Gone with the Wind, and I was reading big books from the time when I was little, and I don't think you can sell the kids short and say, ''Well, we're going to have to dumb it down for them.'' They really don't need that.

We've got some questions from a 12-year-old superfan of yours named Lily. First thing she asks is, ''If Twilight was your first book, what'd you do before that?''
Before that I was a mom. I did scrapbooking! I never finished any of that, though. And I read. I just read all the time. In fact, my husband my used to tease me. I went through six years of always having a little baby in my arms, and so my other hand was pretty much shaped in the form of a book to hold it open. I probably read five or six novels a week.

Next Lily asks, ''Are you writing anymore, because if you aren't I am very mad!''
I am. I have a file of novel ideas just waiting for me. Right now I'm working on book four in the Twilight series, and after that I may work on a sequel to The Host. But then I also have this other novel that's probably a [young adult] story about mermaids, which was always a favorite thing of mine growing up. And I've got mysteries and adventures and all kinds of things in my files. Someday, hopefully, I'll get to write them all.

Lily wonders, ''Did you, like, put a drug in your books that makes them addictive and impossible to put down, or is that just called really good writing?''
[Laughs] I don't know. That's one of the things that's always surprised me, when people say, ''I couldn't put your books down,'' or ''I finished one and picked it up again immediately and reread it.'' That's the hugest compliment in the world. It's exciting that people feel that way.

It's nice of you to answer a few questions from a 12-year-old fan.
Oh no, you know what? I've developed this humongous love for 12-year-old girls! They have the best questions, and they're so into the stories. You really can't write for a better audience. I say to all other authors: If you're not writing for teenage girls, you're missing out on a lot of love.

Originally posted Aug 02, 2007 Published in issue #947 Aug 10, 2007 Order article reprints