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Check out letters from those who agreed with us, and those who didn't

FRASIER SHARP
Thank you so much for finally doing a cover story on one of the best shows on television, Frasier (#299, Nov. 3). Now, how about a cover story on David Hyde Pierce? The show would be incomplete without his presence, and he definitely deserves it. He is without a doubt the funniest person on TV today.
CHAD MAYTON
Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Thanks for the exquisite photos of Frasier's John Mahoney. With eyes and a smile like that, he is as sublimely beautiful as anyone on the small or big screen.
CONNIE GUNDERSON
Irvine, Calif.

Frasier is continuously hailed as the most sophisticated show on the airwaves just because it features supposedly intellectual characters who toss around archaic references that allegedly speak to the literate elite. In reality, Frasier is standard sitcom fare, recycling such stereotypical archetypes as the funny pet, the grumpy father, the eccentric housekeeper, and the oversexed friend.
BENJAMIN NEIDL
Albany, N.Y.

OBLIQUE CHIC
If bleak times breed bleak entertainment (''Bleak Chic''), how do you explain our memorable choices during the turbulent '60s: beach movies, James Bond, spaghetti Westerns, and three — yes, three — Elvis movies almost every year!
RUSS DOCTEUR
Knoxville, Tenn.

I RESEMBLE THAT REMARK
Larry Clark says that Seven is a ''really terrible, awful, sick, sick, sick movie''? Interesting. Throw in pointless and amateurish and you have a perfect description of his movie Kids.
LOWELL BARTHOLOMEE
Austin, Tex.

CRITICAL MATH
Regarding ''my dyscalculic brain'' (the phrase Mary Tyler Moore uses in her book that baffled your critic), dyscalculia is a medical term meaning an inability to solve math problems due to a brain disease or injury. Moore's context — her slowness in realizing, on her first date with her now husband, that he was 18 years younger than she — suggests that she means she's math clumsy, not brain damaged. I think.
DAVID ENGLISH
Somerville, Mass.

WHO'S REALLY TO BLAME?
The article on Showgirls was interesting. Regardless of how much talent Elizabeth Berkley has, it says a lot about the power structure in Hollywood that an unsuccessful film's failure is placed on a young actress, while the director and screenwriter are allowed to continue their hackwork relatively unscathed.
MATT HINRICHS
Chandler, Ariz.

Originally posted Nov 24, 1995 Published in issue #302 Nov 24, 1995 Order article reprints
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