The Fifth Estate Bill Condon's The Fifth Estate is an edgy and exciting drama about WikiLeaks and its founder, the renegade Australian journalist/anarchist Julian Assange. As played by… The Fifth Estate Bill Condon's The Fifth Estate is an edgy and exciting drama about WikiLeaks and its founder, the renegade Australian journalist/anarchist Julian Assange. As played by… 2013-10-18 R PT124M Documentary Daniel Bruhl Benedict Cumberbatch Anthony Mackie Walt Disney Pictures
Movie Review

The Fifth Estate (2013)

MPAA Rating: R
PLEADING THE FIFTH Benedict Cumberbatch is gripping as Julian Assange, however The Fifth Estate gets too deep into the intellectual side of things.
Image credit: Frank Connor
PLEADING THE FIFTH Benedict Cumberbatch is gripping as Julian Assange, however The Fifth Estate gets too deep into the intellectual side of things.
EW's GRADE
B+

Details Release Date: Oct 18, 2013; Rated: R; Length: 124 Minutes; Genre: Documentary; With: Daniel Bruhl, Benedict Cumberbatch and Anthony Mackie; Distributor: Walt Disney Pictures

Bill Condon's The Fifth Estate is an edgy and exciting drama about WikiLeaks and its founder, the renegade Australian journalist/anarchist Julian Assange. As played by Benedict Cumberbatch, Assange is a tall, slit-eyed, and emotionally hooded creature who presents himself as a new kind of information warrior: a subversive of the cyber era who will publish anything that exposes the sins of corporations and governments. Cumberbatch, in long, stringy white-blond hair that looks a bit too much like the wig it is, does a commanding impersonation of the real man's imperiousness and louche narcissism. His Assange has a pout of aggrievement fixed on his soft, pale, babyish features. He's a real contradiction — a reptilian idealist.

Assange passes off WikiLeaks as an 'organization,' but it's really just him, working with fake email addresses and a courtly European assistant, Daniel Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Brühl), who helps man the keyboards. Yet as these two post unedited documents and videos, revealing injustice around the world — corruption at a Swiss bank, death squads in Kenya, the murder of two journalists by U.S. troops in Iraq — The Fifth Estate generates a nervous, almost manic version of the let's-bring-down-the-kingpins rush of a '70s conspiracy thriller.

Condon keeps his camera up close to the actors, plugging us into the electricity of their mission. At the same time, the movie asks: When does the unrestricted flow of information start to destroy all it's out to save? Assange comes on as a reporter, and in a sense he is, but he's like Woodward or Bernstein as a member of the Weather Underground. He's reckless and barely cares if he hurts civilians, so he isn't just outside the system — he's outside the human connection that holds the system together. Condon is shrewd enough to depict Assange not as a hero but as a scoundrel crusader who tests the power of the Internet. The Fifth Estate is flawed (it grips the brain but not the heart), yet it feverishly exposes the tenor of whistle-blowing in the brave new world, with the Internet as a billboard for anyone out to spill secrets. Call it the anti-social network. B+

Originally posted Oct 16, 2013 Published in issue #1282-1283 Oct 25, 2013 Order article reprints
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Weekend of Sep 1 Box Office Source: Rentrak Corp.
Rank Title Weekend Gross* Weeks on Chart Cume. Gross* EW Grade
1.
Guardians of the Galaxy
Walt Disney Pictures
$22.2 5 $280.5 A-
2. $15.7 4 $166.4 C+
3.
If I Stay
Warner Bros.
$11.6 2 $32.2 C-
4. $10.5 3 $59.7 F
5.
As Above, So Below
Universal
$10.3 1 $10.3 C
6.
The November Man
Relativity
$10.2 1 $11.9 C
7. $8.0 2 $18.7 NA
8.
The Giver
Weinstein Co.
$6.9 3 $33.1 C-
9.
The Hundred-Foot Journey
Walt Disney Pictures
$6.3 4 $41.1 B
10.
The Expendables 3
Lionsgate
$4.5 3 $34.2 B
* in millions