Out Among the Stars No one's ever had a reason to call Johnny Cash an underachiever. He put out nearly 100 original albums over the course of his 40-plus-year… Out Among the Stars No one's ever had a reason to call Johnny Cash an underachiever. He put out nearly 100 original albums over the course of his 40-plus-year… 2014-03-25 Johnny Cash Country Columbia
Music Review

Out Among the Stars (2014)

BLAST FROM THE PAST The Man in Black has left behind musical treasures
Image credit: Norman Seeff
BLAST FROM THE PAST The Man in Black has left behind musical treasures
EW's GRADE
C

Details Release Date: Mar 25, 2014; Lead Performance: Johnny Cash; Genre: Country; Production: Columbia

No one's ever had a reason to call Johnny Cash an underachiever. He put out nearly 100 original albums over the course of his 40-plus-year career — even the two released after his 2003 death debuted in the top five, a testament to his eternal outlaw appeal.

But just as they were for Bob Dylan, the '80s were a fallow decade for Cash, plagued by label problems and DOA singles. And The Baron, made with Tammy Wynette's mentor Billy Sherrill in 1981, was such a commercial disappointment that Cash's label decided not to release the pair's second batch of sessions, despite the contributions of collaborators including Waylon Jennings and June Carter Cash.

Those sessions were discovered by Cash's son, John, in 2012, and now with a little bit of tweaking are appearing as Out Among the Stars. It'd be easy to romanticize the album's 12 tracks — at last, the songs the Man didn't want the Man in Black to release! — but the suits might have been right the first time. It's mostly Sherrill's fault; the slide-heavy arrangements and hokey production flourishes would have sounded remarkably cornpone even 30 years ago. Cash's storytelling is mostly on point, and while he's strongest spinning tales of heartbreak (as he does on the teary two-step ''Call Your Mother''), the goofballery of ''If I Told You Who It Was'' feels unbecoming of an artist of his stature. Only the gallows humor of ''I Drove Her Out of My Mind,'' in which Cash unspools a madman's fantasy about buying a Cadillac just so he can drive himself and his ex off a cliff, captures his murderous charm — a totality he wouldn't fully inhabit until his Rick Rubin-assisted redemption in the '90s. Ultimately, Stars is useful only to illuminate exactly why such a rescue mission was necessary. C

Best Tracks:
''I Drove Her Out of My Mind''
''Call Your Mother''

Originally posted Mar 19, 2014 Published in issue #1304 Mar 28, 2014 Order article reprints