Movie Article

All That Glitters

The Golden Globe winners -- Do victories for ''The Truman Show'' and ''Shakespeare In Love'' mean imminent Oscar nominations?

Okay, we've got it: The Academy Awards are like Hollywood's fairy-tale wedding. And the Golden Globes? Well, they're like the family bar mitzvah. Think about it: a glitzy sit-down dinner, buckets of weepy sentimentality, and, for many TV and film stars, an official coming-of-age. Among the celebs who reached award adulthood at the Hollywood Foreign Press Association's 56th-annual big night: The Truman Show's Jim Carrey, who provided the night's biggest jaw dropper by scoring Best Actor in a drama over Tom Hanks; The Practice's Dylan McDermott and Felicity's Keri Russell, who both walked away with their first notable career awards; and Gwyneth Paltrow, named Best Actress in a Comedy for Shakespeare in Love.

Reflecting on Paltrow's victory at the Miramax post-show bash, proud studio cochairman (and Paltrow career godfather) Harvey Weinstein was sufficiently verklemmt: ''I can't even talk thinking about it,'' he gushed.

Then let's change the subject...to the Oscars. Though the Globes are widely considered a glamorous party with a few trophies sprinkled in, their Oscar foreshadowing is undeniable (five of last year's six big Oscar winners won Globes). Carrey even thanked ''the Academy'' in his joshing acceptance speech. ''They have to have some influence,'' said presenter George Lucas. ''All the Oscar voters watch the Globes.''

If that's the case, then Shakespeare and Truman, which have been taking an awards backseat to Saving Private Ryan, would earn the biggest boost from the night, having racked up three prizes each. (In addition, both John Madden and Peter Weir received Directors Guild nods.) Nudged Weinstein, who produced Shakespeare, ''I'd never make a statement like 'It's a real race now,' would I?'' You just did, Harvey.

Still, not everyone was counting his Oscar noms come evening's end. Carrey's win ''puts [our] movie in a position where it has to be considered,'' says Arthur Cohen, marketing president at Paramount, the studio behind Truman. ''But it doesn't mean that the Academy members can't choose entirely differently.'' One sign that he may be right: Carrey and Michael Caine, Best Actor in a Comedy for Little Voice, both failed to receive Screen Actors Guild nominations, which, like the Oscars, are voted on by industry actors.

If nothing else, the Globes' guests of honor will at least enjoy their contact high until next year's rite of passage: As Best Actress in a Drama Cate Blanchett (Elizabeth) noted just after her victory, ''I've been hugged more in the last 4 1/2 minutes than I have in the whole of my lifetime.''


The Winners
Best Drama Saving Private Ryan
Best Comedy Shakespeare in Love
Best Actor, Drama Jim Carrey, The Truman Show
Best Actress, Drama Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth
Best Director Steven Spielberg, Saving Private Ryan
Best Actor, Comedy Michael Caine, Little Voice
Best Actress, Comedy Gwyneth Paltrow, Shakespeare in Love
Best Supporting Actor, Drama Ed Harris, The Truman Show
Best Supporting Actress, Drama Lynn Redgrave, Gods and Monsters
Cecil B. DeMille Lifetime Achievement Award Jack Nicholson
Best TV Drama The Practice
Best TV Comedy Ally McBeal
Best Actor, TV Drama Dylan McDermott, The Practice
Best Actress, TV Drama Keri Russell, Felicity
Best Actor, TV Comedy Michael J. Fox, Spin City
Best Actress, TV Comedy Jenna Elfman, Dharma & Greg

Originally posted Feb 05, 1999 Published in issue #470 Feb 05, 1999 Order article reprints