TV Article

X Cyclopedia: The Ultimate Episode Guide, Season II

A look at '94-'95 episodes of 'The X-Files'

24. LITTLE GREEN MEN
WRITERS: MORGAN/WONG
DIR.: NUTTER
The mothballing of the X-Files banishes Scully to a teaching assignment at Quantico and Mulder to a dreary wiretapping detail. He soon goes AWOL after learning of a satellite-monitoring station in Puerto Rico that has just made contact. Historic moment: First depiction of the abduction of Mulder's sister, recalled in a flashback; Skinner grudgingly starts to concede that Mulder has some credibility. (Personal aside: a noticeably pregnant Anderson was the real reason for Scully's banishment to FBI headquarters.) Critique: Powerfully depicts both Mulder's gnawing sense of defeat and his bond with Scully, strangely growing stronger with separation. Otherwise, fairly standard. B

25. THE HOST
WRITER: CARTER
DIR.: SACKHEIM
A Russian freighter carrying radioactive debris from the Chernobyl meltdown jettisons a parasitic worm man (Fluke Boy, to you) who seeks human victims/hosts in American sewers. Creative casting: Series writer Glen Morgan's brother Darin (who will go on to write some of the series' best episodes) as the creature. Critique: A refreshing instance of a fully and satisfactorily resolved episode — like a perfect meal, although you definitely don't want to eat during this one. A+

26. BLOOD
WRITERS: MORGAN/WONG
STORY: DARIN MORGAN
DIR.: NUTTER
The government is at it again, this time sanctioning experimental insecticide spraying in a sleepy Pennsylvania community. When the chemical, called LSDM, is combined with fear-triggered adrenaline, it compels extreme homicidal behavior via electronic digital displays (ATMs, cell phones, etc.). Creative casting: Porn star (Kimberly) Ashlyn Gere plays an afflicted housewife; William Sanderson (Newhart's Larry) as a really disgruntled postal worker. Critique: Convoluted premise pays off in white-knuckle tension. B+

27. SLEEPLESS
WRITER: GORDON
DIR.: BOWMAN
With Scully still at Quantico, Mulder is saddled with new partner Alex (''Ratboy'') Krycek. The two investigate Vietnam vets who were part of a government ''sleep eradication'' experiment, which succeeded in turning them into killing machines. Twenty-four years later, one of them has acquired the power to kill through his waking dreams. Creative casting: 21 Jump Street grad Steven Williams as recurring character X, Deep Throat's much less patient successor. Critique: Tony Todd's performance as Augustus Cole — the wrathful insomniac — elevates a just-good story into a great one. B+

28. DUANE BARRY
WRITER: CARTER
DIR.: CARTER
Centered on a gripping hostage siege in a travel agency, this is the first of a two-part story leading to Scully's abduction. Duane Barry, the culprit, is a former FBI agent, alleged psychotic, and multiple abductee (with the implant scars to prove it). Historic moment: The most fleshed-out depiction of an abduction so far as Barry relates his experiences to Mulder. More important: Mulder in a Speedo! Creative casting: Steve Railsback (Helter Skelter's Charles Manson) gives another mangily manic performance. Critique: A rough ride for Scully, about to get rougher. A

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