The Martini Teetotalers and the politically correct won't care for Barnaby Conrad III's The Martini , an exhaustive tour of the martini world. The simple concoction of… The Martini Teetotalers and the politically correct won't care for Barnaby Conrad III's The Martini , an exhaustive tour of the martini world. The simple concoction of… Nonfiction Pop Culture Chronicle Books
Book Review

The Martini (1995)

EW's GRADE
B+

Details Writer: Barnaby Conrad III; Genres: Nonfiction, Pop Culture; Publisher: Chronicle Books

Teetotalers and the politically correct won't care for Barnaby Conrad III's The Martini, an exhaustive tour of the martini world. The simple concoction of gin and vermouth that symbolized pre- and postwar sophistication is not nearly as popular as it used to be, though Conrad insists the drink is making a comeback. But you can't take away the potion's glorious past, even if its 19th-century origins are cloudy. In addition to history, tricks of the mixing trade, old ads, and martini-related essays, the book offers sippers proof that theirs is the Drink of the (pop-cultural) Gods: from James Bond (who prefers his shaken, not stirred) to Bette Davis in All About Eve (she had too many). Some may have loved too well. According to Conrad, Humphrey Bogart's last words reputedly were: ''I should never have switched from Scotch to Martinis.'' B+

Originally posted Jun 09, 1995 Published in issue #278 Jun 09, 1995 Order article reprints