Video Article

Repeat When Unnecessary

Different movies, same title -- A breakdown of movies that share nothing but a name, including ''Glory,'' ''Always,'' and more

Two movies called Night and the City are being released on videocassette this week — confusing perhaps, but at least they've got the same plot. In many cases two tapes have titles in common and nothing else, leading to frustration when you go to the store to rent Fatal Attraction, expecting Glenn Close as a sexy psycho and ending up with Sally Kellerman as a sex fantasist. Or looking for Arnold Schwarzenegger in Red Heat and finding Linda Blair instead. Beware of these other video doppelgangers. The one you want:
The Accused (1988, Paramount) Jodie Foster, Kelly McGillis. Gang-raped blue-collar woman is defended by idealistic assistant DA.
The one you might get
The Accused (1949, Paramount) Loretta Young, Robert Cummings. Student-killing lady professor is defended by victim's guardian.
The Difference
Foster's role led to new career as mature actress, Young's, to career as TV hostess.

The one you want:
Always (1989, MCA/Universal) Richard Dreyfuss, Holly Hunter. Dead pilot returns as guardian angel of novice flyboy; Steven Spielberg directs.
The one you might get
Always (1986, LIVE) Henry Jaglom, Patrice Townsend. Ex-wife returns to reconcile with self-absorbed filmmaker; Jaglom directs.
The Difference
Director Spielberg is a legend; director Jaglom is a legend in his own mind.

The one you want:
Betrayed (1988, MGM/UA) Tom Berenger, Debra Winger. FBI agent infiltrates fascist group by romancing handsome farmer/murderer.
The one you might get
Betrayed (1954, MGM/UA) Clark Gable, Lana Turner. Suspected traitor infiltrates Nazi high command by going undercover as chanteuse.
The Difference
Winger's character, unlike Turner's, wears sensible shoes.

The one you want:
Blue Steel (1990, MGM/ UA) Jamie Lee Curtis, Ron Silver. Wall Street psycho finds gun, goes on killing spree.
The one you might get
Blue Steel (1934, National Entertainment) John Wayne, Gabby Hayes. Duke finds a gold mine; town goes on buying spree.
The Difference
Silver's beard is black; Hayes' is white.

The one you want:
The Freshman (1990, Columbia TriStar) Marlon Brando, Matthew Broderick. College boy scams crooked feds in big sting, gets komodo dragon.
The one you might get
The Freshman (1925, Time-Life) Harold Lloyd, Jobyna Ralston. College boy scores winning touchdown in big game, gets girl.
The Difference
Lloyd in football cleats versus Brando on ice skates.

The one you want:
Glory (1989, Columbia TriStar) Matthew Broderick, Denzel Washington. Black soldiers enlist to fight in Civil War.
The one you might get
Glory (1956, Video Communications) Margaret O'Brien, Walter Brennan. White horsewoman enters filly in Kentucky Derby.
The Difference
The horse gets more respect.

The one you want:
Heat (1987, Paramount) Burt Reynolds, Howard Hesseman. Las Vegas bodyguard avenges beating of prostitute.
The one you might get
Heat (1972, Paramount) Joe Dallesandro, Sylvia Miles. Los Angeles gigolo sponges off old movie star.
The Difference
1972 film is intentionally tacky.

The one you want:
Off Limits (1988, FoxVideo) Willem Dafoe, Gregory Hines. Army cops investigate hooker murders in wartime Saigon.
The one you might get
Off Limits(1953, Barr Entertainment) Bob Hope, Mickey Rooney. Army cop turned into prizefighter by rule-breaking manager.
The Difference
Hope and Rooney have marginally more potential as song-and-dance team.

Originally posted Apr 23, 1993 Published in issue #167 Apr 23, 1993 Order article reprints
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