TV Article

News & Notes

Peg Bundy, Susan Olsen, and Julie Brown were in the news this week

Skin Game
Has a strange obsession taken hold at Entertainment Tonight, or is someone just in dire need of a cold shower? For whatever reason, that little computerized dot that obscures parts of the human anatomy has been working overtime at ET ever siice last year's Rob Lowe videotape scandal. A sampling of topics:
· Models Who Have Posed Nude
· Stars Who Bared It All
· Playboy Shoots Girls of the ACC
· Filming a Nude Scene with Mel Gibson
· Nudes on Ice
· Nudity on European TV
· The First Russian Woman to Pose Nude for Playboy

Appetite Suppressant
Recipes not found anywhere in the collected works of Julia Child — ''Bud's Hooter Pie'' and ''Middle Age Spread,'' to name two — will be available to the masses courtesy of Peg Bundy in Pig Out With Peg: Secrets From the Bundy Family Kitchen, due in stores this month.

A Very Wary Brady
''Bradys, get back in the grave! Where's my garlic? Where's my crucifix?'' That was actress Susan Olsen's first reaction when the producers of CBS' The Bradys asked her to return to TV as Cindy Brady, the character she played on The Brady Bunch from 1969 to 1974. ''I was very frightened that the show would be done in the old style. I didn't want it to be has-beens on parade.'' Olsen skipped the Brady Christmas movie but joined the new series. ''These people are my family. And going back allowed me to tie up a lot of loose ends about my childhood.'' She also enjoyed the new, improved Brady home. ''We've lost the green and orange kitchen,'' she says. ''I don't think those were ever popular kitchen colors, do you?''

Just Cast Julie
MTV's Julie Brown (the Earth Girl, not the Club MTV dance master) will turn up next month on NBC's Quantum Leap, playing a stripper who kidnaps her ex- boyfriend's baby and tries to reunite the infant withhits natural mother. Brown cowrote the episode with her twin brother, Paul, Leap's coproducer, so casting was none too difficult.

Ganging Up on Russia
An eye-catching TV ad campaign for Soviet jeans has been depicting L.A. gang conflicts, tensions betwwen Italian-Americans and blacks, and U.S. vs. Japan labor disputes — with the actors in each spot speaking Russian. Some leaders of the black and advertising communities have criticized the use of gangs as a selling tool. But Ed Backholm, marketing director for Seattle Pacific Industries, the jean distributor, says the company's message is peaceful. ''We show a confrontation followed by a relaxation of tensions,'' he explains. ''The message is 'Work it out.''' Business, he adds, has been brisk.

Believe It
BC and Columbia Pictures Television plan to make an hourlong drama series out of True Believer, last year's movie about a counterculture lawyer (James Woods) and his younger, by-the-book associate (Robert Downey Jr.). Taking over those roles for TV are Treat Williams, in his series debut, and Corey Parker, last seen as Lee, the younger man in Melissa's life on thirtysomething. Production on the pilot began last week in New York.

Originally posted Mar 16, 1990 Published in issue #5 Mar 16, 1990 Order article reprints
Advertisement

From Our Partners