Otis Trailer-park rock has never had a more enthusiastic champion than Mojo Nixon. Over the course of five frisky albums loaded with wicked humor, this lovable… Otis Trailer-park rock has never had a more enthusiastic champion than Mojo Nixon. Over the course of five frisky albums loaded with wicked humor, this lovable… Mojo Nixon Rock
Music Review

Otis (1990)

EW's GRADE
B+

Details Lead Performance: Mojo Nixon; Genre: Rock

Trailer-park rock has never had a more enthusiastic champion than Mojo Nixon. Over the course of five frisky albums loaded with wicked humor, this lovable connoisseur of cloddishness has made a career praising and/or abusing junk culture icons in song.

Leering with malevolent delight, Mojo drives his musical Bigfoot over more hapless victims in Otis. The pointed music criticism of ''Don Henley Must Die'' (complete with a guitar quote from ''Hotel California'') vies with ''Destroy All Lawyers'' for the album's most uproarious attack. While Mojo's ''romantic'' side surfaces in such indelicate numbers as ''Rabies Baby,'' ''Perry Mason of Love,'' and ''Gonna Be a New World,'' his grisly embrace of low culture in ''Ain't High Falutin''' and ''I Wanna Race Bigfoot Trucks'' makes you proud to be an American. Mr. Patriotism rocks up the national anthem without causing irreparable damage, and nominates a new Nixon for the presidency in the funky ''Put a Sex Mo-sheen in the White House.''

An ideal set of borrowed sidemen — John Doe (of X), Eric Ambel (Del Lords), Country Dick Montana (Beat Farmers), and Bill Davis (Dash Rip Rock) — provides Mojo with genuinely good music for a change, freeing him to rant and bellow with wanton confidence. Except for an ill-advised bit of seriousness (''Took Out the Trash and Never Came Back'') that falls flat on its can, Otis is a one-man party mo-sheen. B+

Originally posted Sep 07, 1990 Published in issue #30 Sep 07, 1990 Order article reprints
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