Mail

Mail

Everything came up noses at this year's Oscars (#703, April 4). Nicole Kidman won Best Actress for her schnozz-enhanced Virginia Woolf, and Best Actor Adrien Brody gave Halle Berry a close-up of his proboscis before his acceptance speech. Some readers gave a thumbs-down to Michael Moore's antiwar rant, but others detected a whiff of irony. ''I would like to point out the incredible hypocrisy of the people booing Moore for doing what he does so well just moments after giving him a standing ovation, presumably in respect for doing what he does so well,'' notes Genevieve Allen of Portland, Ore. Meanwhile, Helen Lobonc of South Bend, Ind., wished that we had devoted more space to the Oscar family portrait: ''I saw the history of film in the faces of the actors who have touched my heart and changed my life. Oscar is not about the frivolous; it is about things like this portrait.''

Oscar Night Moves

Your Oscar Issue just keeps getting better. EW continues to have the most pictures and the best articles that cover the event. Every year I look forward to your Oscar issue, and I can't wait to see what you all do next year! ALLYSON CLARK Rye, N.Y.

Ken Tucker was obviously, and understandably, in low spirits on Oscar Sunday, but his review of ABC's Academy Awards telecast suggests that he never gave the show a chance. It's as if he were worried that by reviewing an awards show during a crisis, he'd seem callous if he didn't let us know how affected he was by the war. There was indeed plenty to enjoy, even though he didn't have a single nice thing to say about the show. Don't forget that the movies have a long, fine tradition of cheering us up at times like these, and the Oscars are part of that tradition. ERIC STORMOEN Los Angeles

I'm startled that Ken Tucker was ''startled'' that many of us found Adrien Brody's ''self-absorption charming.'' I did not think he was self-absorbed; he was just great. I guess it's all in the interpretation. He was the high point of the show, and good for Halle Berry for going along! CINDY FOWLER Mission Viejo, Calif.

I completely disagree with your put-down of Michael Moore's acceptance speech at the Oscars. In a time when any critique of President Bush seems criminalized, it takes courage to speak your mind, even when doing so is not popular. ANDREA SMITH Ann Arbor, Mich.

I was pleased that the majority of speakers at this year's Academy Awards remembered that they were not attending a political rally, but rather, they were there to celebrate the movies of the past year. Even the outspoken Susan Sarandon had enough class to limit her comments to giving the peace sign on her way to the podium. THERESA ROGERS Abilene, Tex.

Thanks again for the always excellent coverage of the Oscars. But I have one bone to pick. After being robbed of the statuette she so deserved, the almost perfect, elegant Julianne Moore was left off of Clarissa Cruz's best-dressed list in favor of Diane Lane, who looked as though someone puked up sequins and ostrich feathers all over her. RYAN CHASSEE RYE8403@aol.com Mandeville, La.

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