Music

DJ Kay Slay's Corner Shop

The Drama King Picks His 10 All-Time Favorite Mixtapes. Want to Sample Them for Yourself? Try Your Local Street Vendor or Sites Like Mixtapekings.com and Tapemafia.com

* BRUCIE B AND HOLLYWOOD, BLOCK PARTY 1989 That was a classic 111th Street block party. Brucie B was cutting records, Hollywood was MCing over the songs, and they were doing routines.

* KID CAPRI, 52 BEATS It was like a breakbeat collection, with all the classics. That was like a phenomenon. Not just any DJ could've put that together.

* DJ KAY SLAY, STREETSWEEPERS, PART 10 I had Alpo [convicted murderer and drug kingpin] hosting it from the penitentiary. That was when his first article came out in [gritty hip-hop mag] F.E.D.S. I wanted people who had heard about him to hear his personality and hear him talk about some of the things he'd done. It was like a documentary mixtape.

* DJ KAY SLAY, STREETSWEEPERS, PART 7 AND GRIMEY SEASON, PT. 1 Streetsweepers, Part 7 was the one that had ''Live at Summer Jam.'' Jay-Z did ''The Takeover,'' where he went after Nas and the Jay-Z/Nas situation started. Grimey Season, Pt. 1 was hosted by N.O.R.E. It had ''Ether,'' with Nas coming back at Jay-Z. It also had a freestyle with the Lox going at Roc-a-Fella. Prodigy had a freestyle going at Jay-Z. That was a fiery tape.

* DIRTY HARRY AND ANGIE MARTINEZ, DIRTY LOVE That was the illest blend tape of all time, with ''Turn Off the Lights'' by Teddy Pendergrass and stuff like that.

* FUNKMASTER FLEX AND DOO WOP, THE FACE-OFF That was '96. They did the premiere of ''Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Could See,'' the Busta Rhymes record. There was havoc over that.

* DJ KOOL KIRK, DMX VS. CANIBUS They were on their pedestals. Kool Kirk from the Bronx had them going back and forth with their hottest joints.

* TONY TOUCH, 50 MCS, PART 1 He had 50 huge MCs freestyling. He had everybody who was hot, from Wu Tang to Sadat X, Mobb Deep, Beatnuts, Fat Joe.

* DJ KAY SLAY, SAY WHAT YOU SAY That was the first mixtape hosted by Eminem. He was himself on there, belching -- all kind of crazy s -- -that people were loving. That was the whole idea of having the tapes hosted, so you could get the artist's personality. I give that to the audience. He was definitely himself -- violent and real.

Originally posted May 30, 2003 Published in issue #712 May 30, 2003 Order article reprints
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