Movie Article

Remake-Believe

An EW critic on the film he'd like to see remade -- Just imagine a updated ''Network,'' starring Anthony Hopkins and attacking reality TV

Peter Finch, Network | A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD MAN The satire ''Network'' (starring Peter Finch) is ripe for remaking
Image credit: Network: Everett Collection
A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD MAN The satire ''Network'' (starring Peter Finch) is ripe for remaking

An EW critic on the film he'd like to see remade

What movie would you most like to see remade? -- Kathy
How about a gonzo, gloves-off 21st-century update of ''Network'' that blows the lid off the orchestrated sham that is reality TV? Here's the premise: Anthony Hopkins plays the boozy, washed-up host of a chintzy dating reality series who loses it one day on the air. In a rage, he tosses aside his quaint scripted insults and goes on a tirade that climaxes with the instantly famous phrase ''I hate this s---, and I'm not going to fake it anymore!'' He is then given his own real reality show, in which he reduces contestants to tears by saying what he truly thinks of them -- laying bare, in the process, the inner workings of the network as well as the hungry, preening soul of 15-minutes-of-fame America. Let Spike Jonze direct, from a script by Vincent Gallo.

Why do the critical darlings of independent film seemingly sell out to star in blockbuster extravaganzas? -- Kyle
In most cases, I wouldn't call it selling out; it's closer to survival. More and more, movies are organized on two distinct tracks (to simplify, let's call them boutique and blockbuster), so it's imperative for even the most daring performer to establish his or her commercial cred. Otherwise, they simply won't get to do the work they want. An actor who smartly plays both sides of the fence is Matt Damon, shuttling between the catchy escapism of pictures like ''The Bourne Identity'' and ''Ocean's Eleven'' and the exploratory, interior work he did in ''The Talented Mr. Ripley'' and ''All the Pretty Horses.'' Parker Posey, on the other hand, could stand to do a bit more of this; after her triumph in last year's ''Personal Velocity,'' she's ripe for a studio romantic comedy. A former high-wire talent who could stand to do less of it is Nicolas Cage, who crossed over into megaplex stardom after ''Leaving Las Vegas'' and has never really looked back.

What movies do you like to watch over and over? -- John
''Psycho,'' ''The Godfather,'' ''Bringing Up Baby,'' ''Ed Wood,'' ''Boogie Nights.''

(Send questions to askthecritic@ew.com, or post them below.)

Originally posted Sep 15, 2003 Published in issue #729 Sep 19, 2003 Order article reprints
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