News Article

Mail Page

Letters from our readers - EW welcomes feedback, check out the readers who agreed with us, and those who didn't

Their tribe has spoken! Survivor enthusiasts applauded our assertion that the all-star season is the most engrossing one yet (#751, Feb. 13). ''The best Survivor ever, indeed!'' cheers Sarah Hanseler of Ypsilanti, Mich. ''Colby Donaldson and Richard Hatch are two of my favorite Survivors. By putting them on your cover, you made me wish I was Jenna Morasca. I'm happily married, but hey, every woman has her own Fantasy Island.'' Meanwhile, our analysis of a different kind of reality programming -- the performances at the Super Bowl halftime show -- prompted dozens of meditative letters. ''Mark Harris' 'Shock and Bra' is the most intelligent treatment of the Janet Jackson/Justin Timberlake/Super Bowl nonissue that I've seen to date,'' says Michelle Frost of Urbana, Ohio. ''When the sight of a woman's breast is more damaging than seeing young women mistreated by scores of male singers, then we are in truly sad shape.'' Our sentiments exactly.

'Survivor' Instincts

I was so excited to see Survivor: All-Stars featured on your cover! It's good to see the father of all modern reality shows get the recognition it deserves. I think it's fantastic that Mark Burnett has created a long-running reality hit that still maintains class and freshness. And Dalton Ross, as usual, had great commentary on my favorite show of all time. SCOTT ADAMS sadams2@elon.edu Elon, N.C.

The best Survivor ever!? Who will win? Speaking for the millions who think that reality TV is a joke...who cares? These reality participants, picked at random to become famous, are robbing those who have spent years taking acting classes just to get that one break. If downloading music is taking money from the pockets of musicians, then isn't reality TV taking money from those who have worked their tails off for a chance to make it? MARK ROMANSKI markdune41@stny.rr.com Horseheads, N.Y.

Ab Fab Four

EW asking whether the Beatles still matter is like Scientific American asking whether the big bang still matters. Ask again in 10 years, 20, a hundred: Our children and our grandchildren will respond with a resounding ''Yeah!'' Ask whether OutKast, Kid Rock, or Britney Spears still matter, and the answer will be ''Who?'' KEVIN CHORUSEY kevchoru@optonline.net Holbrook, N.Y.

In an age where music sounds insincere, with shock value, million-dollar deals, image, and instant gratification dominating the scene, it's a pleasure knowing that younger generations continue to discover the brilliance of the Beatles. It would be terrific, however, if more folks discovered where it all came from: the blues, jazz, rockabilly, and gospel recordings. Even the Beatles had their blues heroes: Muddy Waters and Lightnin' Hopkins spring to mind. ED PARKER JacoFan@aol.com Kansas City, Mo.

The simple fact that an article is written about the Beatles 40 years after their debut on American TV proves their importance then and now. Forty years from now, the only time anyone will even think about Nickelback or 50 Cent is when they are getting change. ANDREW JOHNSON deandy@adelphia.net Macedonia, Ohio

1 2
Advertisement

From Our Partners