News Article

Candid Cameron

Kinky Cameron Diaz video hits the Web. The 1992 tape, at the heart of the ongoing legal battle between Diaz and a photographer, goes on sale as a streaming video

Cameron Diaz | OOH LA LA A new video starring Diaz (at the Cannes Film Festival in May) is reportedly a bit racier than ''Shrek 2''
Image credit: Cameron Diaz: Hubert Boesl/DPA/NewsCom
OOH LA LA A new video starring Diaz (at the Cannes Film Festival in May) is reportedly a bit racier than ''Shrek 2''

Today, she's Hollywood's highest-paid actress, but in 1992, when she was a 19-year-old unknown, Cameron Diaz posed topless for photographer John Rutter. Last year, she and Rutter became embroiled in a legal battle over the racy photos and video footage, which a Los Angeles Superior Court judge ordered sealed in an injunction last November. But the half-hour video has surfaced at a website called Scandal-Inc, which is selling pay-per-view streams of the half-hour video for $39.95.

According to the New York Post, which coughed up the money and watched the stream, the video shows Diaz and another model named Natasha engaging in some kinky moments with a leather-masked male model, whipping him with chains and walking him like a dog. Diaz appears topless in parts of the video.

Last year, according to wire service reports, Diaz accused Rutter of blackmail, saying he'd demanded $3.3 million to sell the steamy shots back to her. The Los Angeles District Attorney's office tells EW.com that Rutter was initially charged last August with one count each of extortion, attempted grand theft, forgery, and perjury (the extortion charge has since been dropped). He was freed on $250,000 bail to await his criminal trial, which begins July 21. Rutter has said that Diaz granted him the rights to do as he wished with the photos and videos in a signed contract (Diaz claimed he forged her signature), and that he was offering to sell her the material as a courtesy before responding to a $5 million offer from another buyer. He has sued Diaz for $10 million for fraud and breach of contract, a suit that is still pending.

A press release issued by Scandal-Inc. says that Rutter licensed the video to a third party last year, from whom Scandal purchased it. A Diaz spokesperson told the Post: ''A cease and desist letter has been sent to the Web site,'' citing last November's injunction barring the sale or distribution of the footage. But Rutter attorney Ronald Richards told the New York Daily News that his client ''has nothing to do with this Web site. This video has been in existence for 12 years. Someone must have gotten a copy.''

Originally posted Jul 08, 2004