Music Article

Second Coming

Dave Navarro memoir will finally be published -- The ex-Jane's Addiction guitarist releases a cleaned up version of his book about his past drug-fueled exploits

In June of 1998, Dave Navarro, former guitarist for Jane's Addiction and the Red Hot Chill Peppers, made a conscious decision to start shooting up again—even if it killed him. Over the course of a year, he holed up in his Hollywood Hills home, surrounded himself with strippers, hookers, musicians, and movie stars (and L.A. billboard icon-cum-gubernatorial candidate Angelyne!), and documented his heroin-fueled descent with a photo booth and rock biographer Neil Strauss.

And he survived. By 2001, he had cleaned up, started dating Carmen Electra, and was ready to release Don't Try This at Home, a raw collection of reportage, transcripts, and dime-store photo strips. But after an excerpt from the book ran in a magazine, Navarro pulled the plug. Was it the drugs? The random sex? Was it...Angelyne? Around the time of non-publication, Navarro would only say, ''There was information that pertained to my family that I would have rather not made public'' (including references to a strained relationship with his father, which they have since worked to repair).

So a new version, out Oct. 5, presents a more PSA-worthy Navarro. ''Ten Ways to Tie Off'' is now counterbalanced with ''Ten Reasons Not to Tie Off,'' a sexual encounter in a Playboy Mansion bathroom has gone missing, and anecdotes about Hollywood heavies were scrubbed right off the page. ''I took out things that were irrelevant to my past,'' explains Navarro, who more recently had no qualms about MTV documenting his wedding to Electra. ''So it isn't name-dropping.'' Strauss, who has also coauthored popular confessionals like The Dirt with Mötley Crüe and How to Make Love Like a Porn Star with Jenna Jameson, concedes that the last-minute kibosh was ''insanely frustrating,'' but adds, ''Now everyone's a lot happier with it.''

Navarro has already ''gotten s--- for a self-aggrandizing book of stories [written] for the sole purpose of making a buck,'' but claims money is not what made him finally decide to release the tome. ''Ultimately, if I can help dissuade anybody from going down that road [of being an addict], that would make me happier than anything.''

Originally posted Sep 24, 2004 Published in issue #785 Sep 24, 2004 Order article reprints
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