Movie

Fargo (Movie)

Fargo’s wood-chipper turns 20: A brief oral history

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Two decades after the release of Fargo, the snowbanks of our memory are still splattered with Steve Buscemi’s body parts. After searching two states for fugitives Carl Showalter (Buscemi) and Gaear Grimsrud (Peter Stormare), police chief Marge Gunderson (Frances McDormand) comes across a grisly, unforgettable sight: Grimsrud feeding his accomplice into a wood chipper.

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Fargo at 20: William H. Macy recalls his wonderful wintry freakout

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Twenty years ago, Joel and Ethan Coen told a “true” story that took them to the next level as masters of cinema and earned them their first Oscar nominations. Fargo was a darkly comic noir set against the white-out conditions of Minnesota and North Dakota winter. Frances McDormand played the pregnant police chief from Brainerd whose genial manner and sharp investigative eye uncover the links between a multiple murder, two contract hitmen, and a bungled kidnapping.

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Your Thanksgiving streaming guide: Picks for any holiday weekend situation

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The Wonder Years Thanksgiving

Image Credit: Everett Collection

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EW picks nine notable films to chill with

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EW picks nine notable films to chill with

I don’t know where you’re reading this from, but where I’m WRITING from, it’s 101 degrees, roads are liquefying into icky pools of tar, and even New York City mayor Rudolph Giuliani is too prostrate from the heat to snarl. Apart from watching the duffers at my brother-in-law’s country club set the 17th hole on fire with a misaimed fireworks display on Monday night, about the only entertainment I’ve had lately is renting any video featuring snow, icicles, or frostbite.

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The Wonder Year

Your article was right on the money (”1999: The Year That Changed Movies”). We haven’t seen filmmaking of this caliber since the 1970s. The brilliant work produced this year could not have happened without the pioneering films of that decade and some films earlier in the ’90s. American Beauty could not have happened without Fargo, and Go would never have seen life without Pulp Fiction. As for Being John Malkovich, I have no idea where that came from!

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Comic Belief

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“Fargo“ ‘s William H. Macy is in final negotiations to star as the superhero The Shoveller (who gained his powers by discovering King Arthur’s shovel) in the upcoming film “Mystery Men.” The Universal movie is based on the Dark Horse comic book of the same name and costars Geoffrey Rush as villain Cassanova Frankenstein.

This project is the latest movie adaptation of an offbeat comic: Dimension, having found success with two films based on the “The Crow,” is developing a horror franchise created from a soon-to-be-released comic, “Ghosting,” about fraternity hazing gone wrong.

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Oscar 1997/The Winners ...

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PICTUREThe English Patient

DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECTBreathing Lessons: The Life and Work of Mark O’Brien

DIRECTOR Anthony MinghellaThe English Patient

FILM EDITING Walter Murch The English Patient

ACTOR Geoffrey RushShine

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Read any published screenplay, and the first thing you may see is a note from the author telling you how pointless it was to write the thing in the first place. ”Trainspotting is an incredible book…but still I didn’t see it as a film,” insists its adapter, John Hodge. ”I hope the army of admirers of Michael Ondaatje’s novel forgive my sins of omission and commission, my misjudgments and betrayals,” pleads The English Patient’s writer-director Anthony Minghella.

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Has Hollywood lost it?

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Hollywood 2 a.m. A young movie executive is tossing and turning in bed. He gets up, flips on his laptop, and begins typing out a memo. No, not a memo — a MISSION STATEMENT. Suddenly, the answer to his moral dilemma becomes clear: fewer films, less money, more attention to artistic integrity. He entitles it ”The Things We Think And Do Not Say…”

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There’s no question that this immaculately envisioned comedy of errors, told largely in close-ups of a dorky, ever-smiling policewoman (Frances McDormand) who unravels a botched kidnapping scheme, was among the year’s peak moviegoing wonders. But is Fargo also among the year’s best videos? Yes and no. The missteps, delusions, and naivete of the felons involved play out so broadly across the bleak Minnesotan snowscapes that they hold up hilariously on TV screens, even through impulse repeat viewings.

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