Movie

Les Miserables (2012)

Anne Hathaway on Oscar win: ‘I tried to pretend that I was happy'

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“It came true” is how Anne Hathaway began during her Oscars acceptance speech in 2013. But, as the actress revealed during a recent interview, what we all assumed to be her joyous response was a mask for her true feelings.

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DVDs: March 29, 2013

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Les Misérables (2012, PG-13) Hugh Jackman, Anne Hathaway

Victor Hugo’s saga about turbulent 19th-century France gets tarted up as awards bait. Hathaway and Jackman are great, but director Tom Hooper doesn’t seem to understand the concept of restraint. (Also on iTunes) C

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A dream of a song

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The day after Thanks-giving, Anne Hathaway attended a screening of Tom Hooper’s film version of the musical Les Misérables. The L.A. theater was packed, and Hathaway didn’t know what to expect. Twenty-seven minutes in, Hathaway sings the show’s most famous ballad, ”I Dreamed a Dream.” ”The woman who was sitting in front of me started crying so hard that she was actually sobbing out loud,” says the 30-year-old actress. ”That was a pretty cool experience.”

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Frock Star

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If you’ve watched a movie made between 1927 and 1982, chances are you’ve seen the work of Edith Head. For nearly six decades, Head outfitted a roster of stars that could double as a guide to Hollywood’s golden age. While the world changed dramatically during her career — to say nothing of the rising and falling of hemlines — Head was a constant source of onscreen glamour.

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And the Oscar nominees will be...

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Best Picture

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Great performances: Anne Hathaway

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First Anne Hathaway got our hearts pounding as the duplicitous, sexy thief Catwoman in The Dark Knight Rises. Then she busted our tickers in half as Les Misérables’ desperate, dying single mother Fantine, who delivers an aching rendition of ”I Dreamed a Dream” — a performance that has propelled her to the front of the Best Supporting Actress Oscar race. ”With Batman, I didn’t know how fans would react, and I was a little bit nervous,” she says. ”With Les Miz, I had total confidence. Like, bizarro-town confidence.

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25 movies you need to see before Oscar night

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1 Lincoln, (in theatres) Daniel Day-Lewis is a near lock for Best Actor thanks to his soulful performance as the 16th president. In addition to supporting nods for Tommy Lee Jones and Sally Field, the film has a shot at nominations for picture, director (Steven Spielberg), adapted screenplay (Tony Kushner), cinematography, sound, costumes, makeup, editing, production design, and music. (Rated PG-13)

2 Les Misérables, (out Dec. 25)

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A reminder of how Victor Hugo’s novel plays without production numbers. Still a vivid saga of one man’s monomania and another’s redemption, Les Miserables, thanks to director Bille August and scripter Rafael Yglesias, is nearly as compelling as the 1935 Fredric March-Charles Laughton version. Neeson simmers with torment as fugitive Jean Valjean. Rush’s Inspector Javert isn’t as flamboyant as Laughton (who is?), but he tracks Valjean with methodical coldness and unsettling logic. B+

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Beast With Burden

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Godzilla 2000

Sony expected a lot more out of Godzilla last summer than a domestic gross of $136 million – fifth place among the season’s movie releases. An overseas take of $230 million took away some of the sting, but the studio would still love to see ”Godzilla” make a killing when it arrives on video this week. (EW graded the film a C.) Here are this week’s other video releases (with EW’s critics’ grades):

  • Les Miserables Liam Neeson, Uma Thurman, and Geoffrey Rush star in this movie adaptation of the Victor Hugo classic.
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It’s a credit to Victor Hugo’s towering 1862 novel that Les Miserables (Columbia) has been remade so often. The gold standard is still the stirring 1935 version Richard Boleslawski directed for Darryl Zanuck, starring Fredric March as reformed petty thief Jean Valjean and Charles Laughton as Javert, the obsessed police inspector who pursues him relentlessly.

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