Stage

Into the Woods

Emily Blunt defends Into the Woods co-star Johnny Depp's singing ability

Comments +

Emily Blunt has the Big Bad Wolf’s back.

The English actress stuck up for her Into the Woods co-star Johnny Depp’s performance as the zoot-suited villain during a recent interview with EW and People editorial director Jess Cagle on Sirius XM’s EW Radio.

Taken aback by the suggestion that Depp is “not a great singer,” Blunt replied, “Oh, please don’t say that! I loved him in it. Poor Johnny.”

She added, “You didn’t like his Wolf? … I liked him. He’s a good Wolf.”

Read Full Story

See Tituss Burgess sing the Witch's song from Into the Woods for Sondheim's birthday

Comments +

Tituss Burgess, the breakout star of Netflix’s Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, shares at least one thing in common with Titus Andromedon, the breakout character of Netflix’s Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: an abiding respect for musical theater.

Read Full Story

Emily Blunt talks Into the Woods and The Huntsman

Comments +
Nominees Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars Amy Adams, Big Eyes Emily Blunt, Into the Woods Helen Mirren, The Hundred Foot Journey Quvenzhané Wallis, Annie…

Emily Blunt recently starred in Into the Woods as The Baker’s Wife, a mostly good-hearted if conflicted woman. Now, though, Blunt is preparing to go bad. She’s been enlisted for The Huntsman, the follow-up to 2012’s Snow White and the Huntsman. “Other than Into the Woods I haven’t really done a big fantasy,” Blunt told EW. “I am really ready to play a villain.”

Read Full Story

See Meryl Streep sing the cut song Stephen Sondheim wrote for Into the Woods

Comments +

Stephen Sondheim composed the original Tony-winning score and lyrics for Into the Woods before it premiered on Broadway in 1987. But for Rob Marshall’s star-studded Hollywood adaptation, the 84-year-old had something special in mind. He authored a new song for Meryl Streep, who played the Witch. “She’ll Be Back” was intended for the scene after Rapunzel escapes from her tower and runs off with the Prince, leaving the Witch alone and slightly embittered. According to the Hollywood Reporter, the Broadway legend had only one request for his leading lady, a three-time Oscar winner who’d proven her singing chops in Mamma Mia! and A Prairie Home Companion: “Don’t f–k it up.”

She didn’t. But when the film was pieced together, the song was left on the cutting-room floor, a casualty of pacing. On the Blu-ray combo pack, Digital HD/SD, and Disney Movies Anywhere editions of Into the Woods, however—which arrive on March 24—fans can see the complete scene of Streep’s revitalized Witch singing “She’ll Be Back.” 

Entertainment Weekly and People.com have an exclusive peek at the song. Though it’s debatable whether the filmmakers made the correct call, the sequence is a delight to see and hear—especially because no one alive can deliver a dismissive back-handed wave like Streep. Watch the clip below, with an introduction from Marshall.

Read Full Story

On the scene at the Costume Designers Guild Awards: 'It’s not just shopping'

Comments +

Johnny Depp’s Wolf would not be the scheming, menacing predator that he was without his sleazy zoot suit. Ralph Fiennes would not be the extraordinary Grand Budapest Hotel concierge that he was without his tidy purple uniform. The decisions costume designers make affect, well, everything about a film – and the Costume Designers Guild recognized these accomplishments at its 17th annual awards ceremony on Tuesday night.

With Shameless’ Emmy Rossum as its host, the event highlighted costume designers working in film, television, and commercials.

Read Full Story

Oprah Winfrey, Meryl Streep, and Benedict Cumberbatch among Oscar presenters

Comments +

A crop of current nominees are among the latest Oscar presenters announced by the show’s producers. Oprah Winfrey, a producer of the Best Picture-nominated Selma, will present, as will acting nominees Benedict Cumberbatch, Marion Cotillard, Reese Witherspoon, and Meryl Streep. 

Read Full Story

'Into the Woods': EW review

Comments +

It’s a rare thing, the production that manages to give you pause about a familiar musical based on even more familiar stories, and yet, with just 10 actors and a handful of musical instruments (and instruments not quite musical yet musically instrumental), the plucky Fiasco Theatre in conjunction with the Roundabout Theatre Company has restored Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s 27-year-old musical into a wildly inventive, emotionally gut-punching, delightfully off-kilter production.

Read Full Story